Dutch Landscape Etchers of the Seventeenth Century

Front Cover
Yale University Press, 1918 - Etchers - 128 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 110 - The Old Ships I HAVE seen old ships sail like swans asleep Beyond the village which men still call Tyre, With leaden age o'ercargoed, dipping deep For Famagusta and the hidden sun That rings black Cyprus with a lake of fire...
Page 43 - From this period," writes Mr. Binyon, "dates the lamentable change in Ruysdael's art. The master, whose native independence is so marked that one is at a loss to name his probable teacher,1 of his own free will and in sheer mortification of spirit at his want of success, forces himself from the meadows and dunes of his delight, and invents, to win the patronage of the rich men of Amsterdam, a Norway of his own. A visit to North Germany, of which there is some evidence, helped his invention. Now begins...
Page 110 - It was so old a ship — who knows, who knows? — And yet so beautiful, I watched in vain To see the mast burst open with a rose, And the whole deck put on its leaves again.
Page 43 - But failure to appeal to the picturebuying public had had its effect upon him by this time; and, in his desperate need of money, he was not proof against the temptation to copy Everdingen, in order to steal a little of the latter's popularity. "From this period,
Page 55 - never succeeded in finding a quite satisfactory convention for foliage in etched line," but admits that "his continual feeling after truth of rendering, his sensitiveness, to which the forms of branch and leaf are always fresh and wonderful, make his work always interesting. One has only to turn to the facile etchers of sylvan scenery, Waterloo or Swanevelt, or Van der Cabel, to realize the difference between the man who feels what he cannot perfectly master and the man who has perfect mastery of...
Page 56 - This is quite true, though we should not agree to calling The Three Oaks the very best of Ruysdael's work; but it should be remembered at the same time that strength and balance were by no means the qualities at which Ruysdael primarily aimed. What he sought, above all, was a truth and fidelity to nature — • to the externals of nature — far more detailed and intimate than we find in Rembrandt, and of an entirely different order. Rembrandt, an intellectual giant, stood, we may say, boldly and...
Page 37 - ... absolutely idiomatic. II Very little of Ruysdael's solitary and disappointed life is definitely known. It is generally asserted, though there is absolutely no comtemporary evidence to support the tradition that he was born in Haarlem, and the date of his birth has been variously conjectured from 1635 (which would cause him to have painted his first pictures at the age of twelve!) to 1625 or thereabouts. This last is the generally accepted opinion to-day. It seems fairly certain, however, that...
Page 81 - ... the incident is meagre in its details, and permits us merely to guess at the condition of the young burgher artist, at the time. Jan did not remain long in Italy after his brother's death, but returned to Utrecht, where he is said to have endeavored to supply his artistic loss by having Poelenberg paint the figures in his landscapes. Both Jan and Andries etched. The latter produced some thirteen plates, all figure studies — including the items enumerated in Weigel's supplement to Bartsch —...
Page 60 - Ragusa (whence is derived the word "argosy") were great commercial ports in the sixteenth century, it is by no means beyond the bounds of possibility that a citizen of a commercial country, like Holland, should 1 "The Van de Veldes." By William Aspenwall Bradley. The Print-Collector's Quarterly, February, 1917, p. 70. have visited one or the other, or both, and explored the "Hinterland.
Page 49 - Nationale. Paris, 1878. it is interesting to note the eliminations and readjustments to which he resorted in order to bring his main tree-mass just where he wanted it on the plate, and to give it salient relief. "With the exception of some works of his earliest period," writes Dr. Bode, "Ruysdael's landscapes are composed, and their inner construction carefully thought and pondered over.

Bibliographic information