Duty and Healing: Foundations of a Jewish Bioethic

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Psychology Press, 1999 - Medical - 344 pages
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"Duty and Healing" positions ethical issues commonly encountered in clinical situations within Jewish law. The concept of duty is significant in exploring bioethical issues, and this book presents an authentic and non-parochial Jewish approach to bioethics, while it includes critiques of both current secular and Jewish literatures.
Among the issues the book explores are the role of family in medical decision-making, the question of informed consent as a personal religious duty, and the responsibilities of caretakers. The exploration of contemporary ethical problems in healthcare through the lens of traditional sources in Jewish law is an indispensable guide of moral knowledge.
 

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Contents

PROLOGUE
31
The Model of Rights
35
The Model of Expert Counselor
39
The Model of Duty
43
Some Differences Between the Models
48
Morality Within Relationships
52
SECTION 1
67
Introduction
69
The Reasonable Caretaker
175
SECTION 3
191
Introduction
193
The Minima
200
Competence as Capability and as Authorization
213
The Need for Protection
228
Competency Consent to Treatment and Other Social Roles
241
SECTION 4
253

The Standard View
75
Problems with the Standard View
81
Families as Proxies in the Standard View
89
A Family Duty
97
Respectful Service and Reverent Obedience
101
Preventing Pain and Indignity
117
The Priority of Duty
127
Introduction
139
The Duty to Seek Medical Treatment
142
The Duty to Heal
147
The Doctrine of Informed Consent in Jewish Sources
152
The Nature of Medical Choice and Its Implications for Consent
163
Introduction
255
Risking Life to Lengthen Life
262
Risking Pain and Life for Quality of Life
279
The Threshold of Risk Gd Protects Fools
300
Definition and Presentation
309
Summarizing Halakhic Principles of Personal Medical Decision Making
319
Next Steps in Healing and Duty
329
Sources of Jewish Law
333
Glossary
334
Index
336
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About the author (1999)

Benjamin Freedman was a Professor of Medicine and Philosophy in the Biomedical Ethics Unit at McGill University. He wrote extensively on bioethics and was most recently co-editor of Contemporary Health Care Ethics in Canada (1995). He died in 1997. Charles Weijer is Assistant Professor of Medicine in the Office for Bioethics Education and Research at Dalhousie University.

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