Dylan's Visions of Sin

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Harper Collins, Jul 26, 2005 - Music - 528 pages
 
 

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DYLAN'S VISIONS OF SIN

User Review  - Kirkus

A gifted poetry critic takes on the lyrics of rock bard Bob Dylan.Ricks (Humanities/Boston Univ.) has penned tomes on Milton, Keats, Eliot, and Tennyson, but he has long been fascinated by Bob Dylan ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - zappa - LibraryThing

At times playful - at times too playful, so not a five - but with encyclopedic knowledge of Dylan's lyrics, printed and performance, Ricks takes his readers on a tour of Dylan's portrayals of sin ... Read full review

Contents

SinsVirtues Heavenly Graces
1
Songs Poems Rhymes
11
The Sins
49
Envy
51
Covetousness
89
Greed
109
Sloth
114
Lust
145
Prudence
253
Temperance
287
Fortitude
320
The Heavenly Graces
375
Faith
377
Hope
421
Charity
461
Acknowledgments
491

Anger
171
Pride
179
The Virtues
219
Justice
221
General Index
500
Index of Dylans Songs and Writings
508
Which Album a Song is on
512
Copyright

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About the author (2005)

Christopher Ricks is a Warren Professor of the Humanities, codirector of the Editorial Institute at Boston University, and a member of the Association of Literary Scholars and Critics. He was formerly professor of English at the universities of Bristol and Cambridge.

Ricks is the author of Milton's Grand Style (1963), Tennyson (second edition, 1989), Keats and Embarrassment (1974), The Force of Poetry (1984), T.S. Eliot and Prejudice (1988), Beckett's Dying Words (1993), Essays in Appreciation (1996), Allusion to the Poets (2002), and Reviewery (2003). He is also the editor of Poems of Tennyson (second edition, 1987), The New Oxford Book of Victorian Verse (1987), A.E. Housman: Collected Poems and Selected Prose (1988), Inventions of the March Hare: Poems 1909–1917 by T.S. Eliot (1996), The Oxford Book of English Verse (1999), Selected Poems of James Henry (2002), and Decisions and Revisions in T.S. Eliot (2003).

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