Dynamic Psychology

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Columbia University Press, 1918 - Psychology - 210 pages
 

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Page 79 - Sudden glory is the passion which maketh those grimaces called laughter; and is caused either by some sudden act of their own that pleaseth them; or by the apprehension of some deformed thing in another, by comparison whereof they suddenly applaud themselves. And it is incident most to them that are conscious of the fewest abilities in themselves; who are forced to keep themselves in their own favour by observing the imperfections of other men.
Page 63 - We may say, then, that directly or indirectly the instincts are the prime movers of all human activity...
Page 62 - THE human mind has certain innate or inherited tendencies which are the essential springs or motive powers of all thought and action, whether individual or collective, and are the bases from which the character and will of individuals and of nations are gradually developed under the guidance of the intellectual faculties.
Page 83 - Ideas that in themselves are not all of kin, come to be so united in some men's minds, that it is very hard to separate them; they always keep in company, and the one no sooner at any time comes into the understanding, but its associate appears with it...
Page 83 - ... The ideas of goblins and sprites have really no more to do with darkness than light ; yet let but a foolish maid inculcate these often on the mind of a child, and raise them there together, possibly he shall never be able to separate them again so long as he lives ; but darkness shall ever afterwards bring with it those frightful ideas, and they shall be so joined, that he can no more bear the one than the other.
Page 83 - Some of our ideas have a natural correspondence and connexion one with another : it is the office and excellency of our reason to trace these, and hold them together in that union and correspondence which is founded in their peculiar beings.
Page 212 - Price, $1.50 net. THE PRINCIPLES OF POLITICS FROM THE VIEWPOINT OF THE AMERICAN CITIZEN. By JEREMIAH W. JENKS, LL.D., Professor of Government and Public Administration in New York University.
Page 84 - ... ideas together, that a book becomes their aversion, and they are never reconciled to the study and use of them all their lives after; and thus reading becomes a torment to them, which otherwise possibly they might have made the great pleasure of their lives. There are rooms convenient enough that some men cannot study in, and fashions of vessels, which though...
Page 63 - The instinctive impulses determine the ends of all activities and supply the driving power by which all mental activities are sustained...
Page 67 - The great aim of the book is, that is to say, to attempt to show that any mechanism — except perhaps some of the most rudimentary that give the simple reflexes — once it is aroused, is capable of furnishing its own drive and also of lending drive to other connected mechanisms.

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