Dynamics of Organizational Populations: Density, Legitimation, and Competition

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Oxford University Press, Jan 2, 1992 - Business & Economics - 304 pages
Why does the number of organizations of any given kind vary over time? Utilizing a diverse group of organizations including national labor unions, newspapers and newspaper publishers, brewing firms, life insurance companies, and banks, this book seeks to deepen and broaden the understanding of change in organizational populations by examining the dynamics of numbers of organizations in populations. Such an approach involves explaining the sources of growth and decline in the sum of organizations (what the authors call "density") over the histories of populations of organizations. The authors conclude their study by formulating a theory of density-dependent legitimation and competition.
 

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Great book! The authors do an admirable job of examining companies as individual units and examining how competition and other factors affect the number of companies in existence, rather than just lumping the companies together and examining the amount of money in the sector. The authors also do a good job of reviewing ecological literature and asking how previous ecological studies on species populations may relate to the ideas they present. I am an ecologist by training, and the book was written so clearly that I could understand it well.  

Contents

1 Introduction
3
2 Theoretical Approach
25
3 Models and Modeling Strategy
50
4 Density and Founding Rates
75
5 Interactions Between Subpopulations
98
6 Density and Organizational Mortality
116
7 Complications
143
8 Population Trajectories
168
9 Implications for Social Organization
188
Designs of Empirical Studies
207
Methods of Analysis
232
Simulation Program
248
References
261
Name Index
279
Subject Index
283
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