Dynamometers and the Measurement of Power: A Treatise on the Construction and Application of Dynamometers

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J. Wiley & sons, 1900 - Dynamometer - 394 pages
 

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Page 102 - The pulley on an engine shaft is 5 feet in diameter, and it makes 100 revolutions per minute. The motion is transmitted from this pulley to the main shaft by a belt running on a pulley, and the difference in tension between the tight and slack sides of the belt is 1 15 Ibs.
Page 193 - At the up-stream end and at the throat there are pressure-chambers, at which points the pressures are taken. The action of the tube is based on that property which causes the small section of a gently expanding frustum of a cone to receive, without material resultant loss of head, as much water at the smallest diameter as is discharged...
Page 312 - ... decreasing the friction loss. Moreover, with this arrangement, as also with the independent motor, the machinery may often be placed to better advantage in order to suit a given process of manufacture; shafts may be placed at any angle without the usual complicated and often unsatisfactory devices, and a setting-up room may be provided in any suitable location as required, without carrying long lines of shafting through space. This is an important consideration, for not only is the running expense...
Page 68 - ... the bottom of the stationary half cell which it faces. The effectiveness of this combination to resist rotation will be seen to depend essentially on this quasiantagonistic virtual approach of the moving to the stationary half cells. The channel and the whole casing is filled with water, and the turbine is made to rotate as described. When the turbine is thus put in motion, the water contained in each of its half cells is urged outwards by centrifugal force; and in obeying this impulse it forces...
Page 233 - ... fibre. The mirror is placed in the axis of a large coil of wire, which completely surrounds it, so that the needle is always under the influence of the coil at whatever angle it is deflected to. A beam of light from a lamp placed behind a screen, about...
Page 9 - ... In the ordinary machine shop this loss will probably average from 40 to 50 per cent. No matter how well a long line of shafting may have been erected, it soon loses its alignment and the power necessary to rotate it is increased. In machine shops with a line of main shafting running down the center of a room, connected by short belts with innumerable counter-shafts on either side, often by more than one belt and, as frequently happens, also connected to one or more auxiliary shafts which drive...
Page 209 - ... as shown. Connected with the scale is a brass screw passing through a socket, fastened to another shorter sliding piece, shown above, which can be clamped at any point on the frame, and the scale with hook moved in either direction by the milled head nut.
Page 189 - ... shown in Fig. 217. It is placed so that the water discharged by the pump passes through it. It is used in any place where water-supply or consumption is to be measured. The internal arrangement of the Worthington meter is shown in longitudinal section in Fig. 217 and in transverse section in Fig. 218. The plungers AA are closely fitted in parallel rings. The water passes through the inlet and port /, and is admitted under pressure into the chamber...
Page 311 - In many cases with individual motors, owing to wide variations in power required, the average efficiency of the motor may be very low; for this reason a careful consideration of the conditions governing each case indicates that for ordinary machine-driving, especially with small machines, short lengths of light shafting may be frequently employed to good advantage, and the various machines, arranged in groups, may be driven from one motor. By this method fewer motors are required, and each may be...
Page 313 - ... alone, besides frustrating some of the principal objects of this method of transmission. As far as the efficiency of transmission is concerned, it is doubtful whether, in a large number of cases, motor-driving per se is any more efficient than well-arranged engines and shafting. As already pointed out, the principal thing to be kept in mind is a desired increase in efficiency of the shop plant in turning out product, with a reduction in the time and labor items, without especial reference to...

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