Early American cinema in transition: story, style, and filmmaking, 1907-1913

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University of Wisconsin Press, Dec 13, 2001 - Business & Economics - 306 pages
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The period 19071913 marks a crucial transitional moment in American cinema. As moving picture shows changed from mere novelty to an increasingly popular entertainment, fledgling studios responded with longer running times and more complex storytelling. A growing trade press and changing production procedures also influenced filmmaking. In Early American Cinema in Transition, Charlie Keil looks at a broad cross-section of fiction films to examine the formal changes in cinema of this period and the ways that filmmakers developed narrative techniques to suit the fifteen-minute, one-reel format. Keil outlines the kinds of narratives that proved most suitable for a single reel's duration, the particular demands that time and space exerted on this early form of film narration, and the ways filmmakers employed the unique features of a primarily visual medium to craft stories that would appeal to an audience numbering in the millions. He underscores his analysis with a detailed look at six films: The Boy Detective; The Forgotten Watch; Rose O'Salem-Town; Cupid's Monkey Wrench; Belle Boyd, A Confederate Spy;and Suspense.

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Early American cinema in transition: story, style, and filmmaking, 1907-1913

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Keil (cinema studies & history, Univ. of Toronto) examines early American silent cinema in terms of narrative, showing how narrative film techniques evolved in terms of length, complexity, and ... Read full review

Contents

Time
83
The Style
125
Six Sample Films
175
Copyright

6 other sections not shown

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References to this book

Encyclopedia of Early Cinema
Richard Abel
No preview available - 2004
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About the author (2001)

Keil is associate professor in the Cinema Studies Program and the Department of History at the University of Toronto.