Early Settlers and Indian Fighters of Southwest Texas

Front Cover
B.C. Jones & Company, printers, 1900 - Frontier and pioneer life - 844 pages
 

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I have been a Texas history buff for all of my adult life and have read any and everything I could find on early Texas history. Along with my reading, I have talked to anyone with any connection to the early times in Texas and have visited all of the battle sites and place of Texas historical interest. Was Chairman of my local county Historical Commission for 9 years. As you can see, anything about Texas is my cup of tea.
Folks, this is the most informational book I have ever read about early Texas. A person could read for several years and never be exposed to the information contained in this one book.
jlhhon
 

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A wonderful historical glimpse back in time. Read it and see if it does not clear-up your image of what it must have been like to live in Texas in 1830.

Contents

I
xi
II
32
III
38
IV
46
V
53
VI
90
VII
97
VIII
105
LXIX
477
LXX
480
LXXI
483
LXXII
498
LXXIII
503
LXXIV
508
LXXV
513
LXXVII
519

IX
106
X
114
XI
119
XII
126
XIII
131
XIV
137
XV
141
XVI
148
XVII
155
XVIII
159
XIX
165
XX
170
XXI
178
XXII
181
XXIII
188
XXIV
195
XXV
202
XXVI
206
XXVII
223
XXVIII
229
XXIX
233
XXX
242
XXXI
246
XXXII
249
XXXIII
257
XXXIV
261
XXXV
265
XXXVI
268
XXXVII
271
XXXVIII
275
XXXIX
280
XL
284
XLI
291
XLII
295
XLIII
303
XLIV
309
XLV
331
XLVI
337
XLVII
339
XLVIII
343
XLIX
347
L
353
LI
368
LII
375
LIII
381
LV
383
LVI
397
LVII
399
LVIII
401
LIX
405
LX
409
LXI
434
LXII
441
LXIII
443
LXIV
453
LXV
458
LXVI
460
LXVII
468
LXVIII
472
LXXVIII
525
LXXX
527
LXXXI
530
LXXXII
536
LXXXIII
539
LXXXIV
542
LXXXV
554
LXXXVI
561
LXXXVII
567
LXXXVIII
575
LXXXIX
582
XCI
587
XCII
591
XCIII
595
XCIV
602
XCV
607
XCVI
610
XCVII
612
XCVIII
620
XCIX
624
C
634
CI
638
CII
642
CIII
645
CIV
651
CV
663
CVI
672
CVII
677
CVIII
680
CIX
683
CX
692
CXI
696
CXII
704
CXIII
710
CXIV
713
CXV
720
CXVI
735
CXVII
742
CXVIII
745
CXIX
752
CXX
761
CXXI
765
CXXII
772
CXXIII
774
CXXIV
776
CXXV
780
CXXVI
782
CXXVII
785
CXXVIII
787
CXXIX
789
CXXX
798
CXXXI
805
CXXXII
811
CXXXIII
814
CXXXIV
828
CXXXV
835
CXXXVI
841
CXXXVII
843

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Page 260 - Master, were induced to search for his body, which had been rudely and indiscriminately buried in the field of slaughter. They accordingly repaired to the place, and by direction of a person who was on the ground at the time of his burial, a spot was found where the earth had been recently turned up. Upon...
Page 260 - ... in Boston : from whence, by a large and respectable number of brethren, with the late grand officers, attending in procession, they were carried to the stone chapel, where an animated eulogium was delivered by brother Perez Morton. The body was then deposited in the silent vault, " without a sculptured stone to mark the spot ; but, as the whole earth is the sepulchre of illustrious men, his fame, his glorious actions, are engraven on the tablet of universal remembrance, and will survive marble...
Page 669 - In the summer of 1848, our colony of "Bettina" went to pieces like a bubble. As I have said, it was a communistic society and accordingly had no real government. Since everybody was to work if he pleased and when he pleased, the result was that less and less work was done as time progressed. Most of the professional men wanted to do the directing and ordering, while the mechanics and laborers were to carry out their plans. Of course, the latter failed to see the justice of this ruling, and so no...
Page 667 - In addition, he there bought two wagons of sij yokes of oxen each, and two mule teams of eight mules each, for we had an immense amount of baggage. In addition to what we had brought from home and had purchased at Darmstadt, we had laid in a big supply at Hamburg and Galveston. We had supplies of every kind imaginable; for instance, complete machinery for a mill, a number of barrels of whiskey, and a great many dogs of whom Morro was the largest, being three feet high. We came prepared to conquer...
Page 665 - ... the primeval forests abounded in wild fowl of every kind. And what he said was true. It is a glorious land; and I am glad that I came here. It was in this way that Gustave Schleicher, a graduate of the University of Giessen and already an engineer on the Meinecker Road, and Wundt, a student of law, were won for the enterprise. A communistic society was organized of which friendship, freedom, and equality were the watchwords. It had no regular scheme of government, so far as I know. In fact, being...
Page 320 - In vain the Comanches tried to turn their horses and make a stand, but such was the wild confusion of running horses, popping pistols, and yelling rangers, that they abandoned the idea of a rally and sought safety in flight.
Page 663 - REINHABDT. [The following account represents the substance of an interview with Mr. Reinhardt, of Arneckeville, De Witt county, Texas, who is one of the first settlers in this community. The visionary undertaking here described has become famous among German-Americans in this State on account of the connection with it of Hon. Gustave Schleicher, Dr. Herff, and many other prominent men. — RUDOLPH KLEBEBO, JR.] This colony owed its origin to the efforts of Prince Solms-Braunfels, Baron von Meusebach,...
Page 668 - ... Llano." One could see the bottom at the deepest places. The whole country was covered with mesquite grass as high as the knee, and abounded in buffalo and deer. On the other side we came to a big live-oak; and here we camped. Putting our wagons in a circle, we constructed a big tent in the centre, planted our cannon, and put out a guard. Feeling perfectly secure in our fortified camp, we celebrated that night until 3 o'clock. A bowl of punch was prepared, and we sang our favorite songs, while...
Page 669 - ... days absence they reported that they were unable to find the robbers. The Indians camped only a short distance from us. During the night a number of our utensils were stolen by the squaws; but the next day the men returned them. For everything we gave them we were paid back three-fold. As they staid some time, we became well acquainted.
Page 669 - ... eat first. The fact was that a great number of Waco Indians had been treacherously poisoned some time before by a band of cowboys. It was a dastardly deed; and the Wacos thereafter became the most hostile of the tribes, as before they had been the most amicable. Well, the end of my interview was that they took everything I had and galloped off: They were hardly out of sight when I saw a big crowd of savages riding up, and as they drew nearer, I recognized the chief, Santana. Upon my asking him...

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