Early history of the Creek Indians and their neighbors

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Govt. Print. Off., 1922 - Choctaw Indians - 492 pages
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Deals with all nations once belonging to the Creek Confederacy: Hitchiti, Alabama, and Choctaw groups; Tuskegee, Guale, Yamasee, Cusabo, Chatot, Osochi; Muskogee and Natchez branches; Uchean and Timuquanan stock; South Florida Indians; Tamahiti
 

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Page 375 - ... arquebuse can be aimed at them. Before a Christian can make a single shot with either, an Indian will discharge three or four arrows ; and he seldom misses of his object. Where the arrow meets with no armour, it pierces as deeply as the shaft from a crossbow. Their bows are very perfect ; the arrows are made of certain canes, like reeds, very heavy, and so stiff that one of them, when sharpened, will pass through a target. Some are pointed with the bone of a fish, sharp...
Page 173 - Governor, presently as he found himself in the field, called for a horse, and, with some followers, returned and lanced two or three of the Indians; the rest, going back into the town, shot arrows from the palisade. Those who would venture on their nimbleness came out a stone's throw from behind it, to fight, retiring from time to time, when they were set upon. At the time of the affray there was a friar, a clergyman, a servant of the Governor, and a female slave in the town, who, having no time...
Page 393 - Then the cupbearer brings the hot drink in a capacious shell, first to the chief, and then, as the chief directs, to the rest in their order, in the same shell. They esteem this drink so highly, that no one is allowed to drink it in council unless he has proved himself a brave warrior.
Page 123 - I had taken up my lodging on the border of an ancient burying ground; sepulchres or tumuli of the Yamasees, who were here slain by the Creeks in the last decisive battle, the Creeks having driven them into this point, between the doubling of the river, where few of them escaped the fury of the conquerors.
Page 201 - Eight dayes joray down this river lives a white people which have long beardes and whiskers and weares clothing, and on some of ye other rivers lives a hairey people...
Page 79 - Land be overgrown with weeds through their lazinesse, yet they have two or three crops of Corn a year, as the Indians themselves inform us. The Country abounds with Grapes, large Figs, and Peaches; the Woods with Deer, Conies, Turkeys, Quails, Curlues, Plovers, Teile, Herons; and as the Indians say, in Winter, with Swans, Geese, Cranes, Duck and Mallard, and innumerable of other...
Page 283 - Cypress bark or shingles; every habitation consists of four oblong square houses, of one story, of the same form and dimensions, and so situated as to form an exact square, encompassing an area or courtyard of about a quarter of an acre of ground, leaving an entrance into it at each corner.
Page 240 - In the centre of the town, we passed a large building, with a conical roof, supported by a circular wall about three feet high : close to it 34 265 was a quadrangular space, enclosed by four open building?, with rows of benches rising above one another : the whole was appropriated, we were informed, to the Great Council of the town, who meet, under shelter, or in the open air, according to the weather. Near the spot was a high pole, like our May-poles, with a bird at the top, round which the Indians...
Page 399 - ... they turn their backs they are presently upon them. They avoid nothing/ more easily than the flight of an arrow. They never remain quiet, but are continually running, traversing from place to > place, so that neither crossbow nor arquebuse can be aimed at them. Before a Christian can make a single shot with either, / an Indian will discharge three or four arrows ; and he seldom misses of his object. Where the arrow meets with no armor, it pierces as deeply as the shaft from a crossbow.
Page 42 - In the town were found a dirk and beads that had belonged to Christians, who, the Indians said, had many years before been in the port, distant two days' journey. He that had been there was the Governor-licentiate Ayllon, who came to conquer the land, and, on arriving at the port, died, when there followed divisions and murders among the chief personages, in quarrels as to who should...

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