Early Popular Poetry of Scotland and the Northern Border, Volume 1

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David Laing, William Carew Hazlitt
Reeves and Turner, 1895 - Dialect poetry, Scottish
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Page 291 - A dungeon horrible on all sides round, As one great furnace flamed ; yet from those flames No light ; but rather darkness visible, Served only to discover sights of woe, Regions of sorrow, doleful shades, where peace And rest can never dwell ; hope never comes, That comes to all ; but torture without end Still urges, and a fiery deluge, fed With ever-burning sulphur unconsumed.
Page 117 - Requeisting him to mak me quaint Of the beginning and the event, That happenit thair at the Harlaw : Then he entreited me tak tent, And he the truth sould to me schaw.
Page 212 - It has been a favourite subject with our English ballad-makers to represent our kings conversing, either by accident or design, with the meanest of their subjects. Of the former kind, besides this song of the King and the Miller, we have King Henry and the Soldier ; King James I.
Page 82 - In the introduction to the prophecies, however, there is so much more fancy and elegance than in the prophecies themselves, that they can hardly be supposed to be the composition of the same person. Indeed, the internal evidence to the contrary almost amounts to a proof that they are not...
Page xvi - Ferambrace That worthily our-cummyn was Throw the rycht douchty Olywer. The gud king upon this maner Comfortyt thaim that war him ner ; And maid thaim gamyn and solace Till that his folk all passyt was.
Page 121 - And maid thair faes befor them fall, Quha then that race did sairly rew. And then the worthy Lord Salton, The strong undoubted Laird of Drum, The stalwart Laird of Lawristone, With ilk thair forces, all and sum.
Page 233 - Thow fand me fechand nathing that followit to feid, I war ane fule gif I fled, and fand nane affray ; Bot as ane lauchfull man my laidis to leid, That leifis with mekle lawtie and laubour in fay. Be the Mother and the Maydin that maid vs remeid...
Page 220 - Quhill he stakkerit thair with all Half the breid of the hall, He faind neuer of ane fall, Quhill he the eird fand.
Page 231 - I am bot ane mad man, that thow hes heir met, I haue na myster to matche with maisterfull men ; Fairand ouir the feildis, fewell to fet, And oft fylit my feit in mony foull fen ; Gangand with laidis, my gouerning to get.
Page 60 - Eurydice is transformed into a beautiful romantic tale of faery, and the Gothic mythology engrafted on the fables of Greece. Heurodis is represented as wife of Orfeo, and Queen of Winchester, the ancient name of which city the romancer, with unparalleled ingenuity, discovers to have been Traciens, or Thrace. The monarch, her husband, had a singular genealogy : — ' His fader was comen of King Pluto, And his moder of King Juno ; That sum time were as godes y-holde, For aventours that thai dede and...

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