Earth-Hunger and Other Essays

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Transaction Publishers, Jan 1, 1980 - Social Science - 404 pages
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Contents

THE TEACHERS UNCONSCIOUS SUCCESS
9
THE SCIENTIFIC ATTITUDE OF MIND
17
EARTH HUNGER
31
PURPOSES AND CONSEQUENCES
67
RIGHTS
79
EQUALITY
87
THE FIRST STEPS TOWARD A MILLENNIUM 1888
93
WHAT IS CIVIL LIBERTY?
109
AN EXAMINATION OF A NOBLE SENTIMENT
212
THE BANQUET OF LIFE
217
SOME NATURAL RIGHTS
222
THE ABOLITION OF POVERTY
228
THE BOON OF NATURE
233
LAND MONOPOLY
239
A GROUP OF NATURAL MONOPOLIES
245
ANOTHER CHAPTER ON MONOPOLY
249

IS LIBERTY A LOST BLESSING?
131
WHO IS FREE? IS IT THE SAVAGE?
136
WHO IS FREE? IS IT THE CIVILIZED MAN?
140
WHO IS FREE? IS IT THE MILLIONAIRE?
145
WHO IS FREE? IS IT THE TRAMP?
150
LIBERTY AND RESPONSIBILITY
156
LIBERTY AND LAW
161
LIBERTY AND DISCIPLINE
166
LIBERTY AND PROPERTY
171
LIBERTY AND OPPORTUNITY
176
LIBERTY AND LABOR
181
DOES LABOR BRUTALIZE?
187
LIBERTY AND MACHINERY
193
THE DISAPPOINTMENT OF LIBERTY
198
SOME POINTS IN THE NEW SOCIAL CREED
207
THE FAMILY MONOPOLY
254
THE FAMILY AND PROPERTY
259
THE STATE AND MONOPOLY
270
DEMOCRACY AND PLUTOCRACY
283
DEFINITIONS OF DEMOCRACY AND PLUTOCRACY
290
THE CONFLICT OF PLUTOCRACY AND DEMOCRACY
296
DEMOCRACY AND MODERN PROBLEMS
301
SEPARATION OF STATE AND MARKET
306
SOCIAL WAR IN DEMOCRACY
312
ECONOMICS AND POLITICS
318
THE POWER AND BENEFICENCE OF CAPITAL 1899
337
SOCIOLOGICAL FALLACIES 1884
357
WHAT OUR BOYS ARE READING 1880
367
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Page xxi - Does it require deep intuition to comprehend that man's ideas, views, and conceptions, in one word, man's consciousness, changes with every change in the conditions of his material existence, in his social relations and in his social life?
Page 17 - The classification of facts, the recognition of their sequence and relative significance is the function of science, and the habit of forming a judgment upon these facts unbiased by personal feeling is characteristic of what may be termed the scientific frame of mind.
Page 17 - The classification of facts and the formation of absolute judgments upon the basis of this classification — judgments independent of the idiosyncrasies of the individual mind — essentially sum up the aim and method of modern science.
Page xxi - The two races have not yet made new mores. Vain attempts have been made to control the new order by legislation. The only result is the proof that legislation cannot make mores.
Page 24 - The only security," said the aging Sumner in 1905 to a group of young men who had just been initiated into the society of Sigma Xi, "is the constant practise of critical thinking. We ought never to accept fantastic notions of any kind ; we ought to test all notions ; we ought to pursue all propositions until we find out their connection with reality.

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