Earth House Hold: Technical Notes & Queries to Fellow Dharma Revolutionaries

Front Cover
New Directions Publishing, 1969 - Fiction - 143 pages
4 Reviews

Both Pound and Williams have shown a good poet can revitalize prose style. Earth House Hold (a play on the root meaning of "ecology"), drawn from Gary Snyder's essays and journals, may prove a landmark for the new generation.

"As a poet," Snyder tells us, "I hold the most archaic values on earth. They go back to the late Paleolithic; the fertility of the soil, the magic of animals, the power-vision in solitude, the terrifying intuition and rebirth; the love and ecstasy of the dance, the common work of the tribe." He develops, as replacement for shattered social structures. a concept of tribal tradition which could lead to "growth and enlightenment in self-disciplined freedom. Whatever it is or ever was in any other culture can be reconstructed from the unconscious through meditation...the coming revolution will close the circle and link us in many ways with the most creative aspects of our archaic past."

 

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User Review  - dbsovereign - LibraryThing

Provides a good background for understanding Snyder and the milieu from which he emerged. Includes essays on is journey through the East, his work, and his encounters with Zen. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - hadwalmer - LibraryThing

This is an sourcebook on the trail for me, connecting my initial love of Gary's deep seeing of the perfect natural world with Buddhist meditative practice which I deeply love from my practice, though Theravadin, not Zen. A call to community: people and all species, all world. Read full review

Contents

Lookouts Journal
1
Review
25
Japan First Time Around
31
Spring Sesshin at Shokokuji
44
Tanker Notes
54
Record of the Life of the Chan Master Pochang
69
A Journey to Rishikesh and Hardwar
83
Buddhism and the Coming Revolution
90
Glacier Peak Wilderness Area
94
Passage to More Than India
103
Why Tribe
113
Poetry and the Primitive
117
Dharma Queries
131
SuwanoSe Island and the Banyan Ashram
135
Copyright

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Page 150 - I hold the most archaic values on earth. They go back to the Neolithic: the fertility of the soil, the magic of animals, the power-vision in solitude, the terrifying initiation and rebirth, the love and ecstasy of the dance, the common work of the tribe.

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About the author (1969)

Born in 1930 in San Francisco, Gary Snyder grew up in the rural Pacific Northwest. He graduated from Reed College in 1951 with degrees in anthropology and literature, and later, 1953–56, studied Japanese and Chinese civilization at Berkeley, returning there to teach in the English Department. Throughout these years, Gary Snyder worked at various outdoor jobs—as a seaman, as a lookout in Mt. Baker National Forest, as a choker setter for a logging company, on a trail crew at Yosemite National Park. These experiences are integrally reflected in such works as Riprap and Myths and Texts. As he has remarked, "I’ve come to realize that the rhythms of my poems follow the rhythm of the physical work I’m doing and the life I’m leading at any given time—which makes the music in my head which creates the line." After participating in the San Francisco revival, the beginning of the beat poetry movement, with Ginsberg, Whalen, Rexroth and McClure, Snyder quietly went off to Japan in 1955 where he stayed for eighteen months, living in a Zen monastery. In 1958, he joined the tanker "Sappa Creek" and traveled around the world. In early 1959 he again returned to Japan where, apart from six months in India, he studied Kyoto under Oda Sesso Roshi, the Zen master and Head Abbot of Daitoku-Ji. He has spent further time (1966–67) in Japan on a Bollingen research grant. In 1969 he received a Guggenheim grant and toured the Southwestern United States visiting various Indian tribes.

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