East and West India Sugar: Or, A Refutation of the Claims of the West India Colonists to a Protecting Duty on East India Sugar

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Lupton Relfe, 1823 - Slavery - 128 pages
 

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Page 123 - From these facts,' they go on to say, ' the House will be able to judge to what an alarming extent the distresses of the Sugar Planters have already^ reached, and with what accelerated rapidity they are now increasing ; for the sugar estates lately brought to sale, and now in the Court of Chancery in this Island and in England, amount to about one-fourth of the whole number of the Colony.
Page 78 - I ask, is there any one regulation of any part of our commerce, which, if this argument be valid, may not equally be objected to, on the ground of its affecting some man's patrimony, some man's property, or some man's expectations? Let it never be forgotten, that the argument I am canvassing would be just as strong, if the possession affected were small, and the possessors humble; for on every principle of justice, the property of any single individual, or small number of individuals, is as sacred,...
Page 78 - ... must, on the principles which I shall presently insist on, have been void, even from the beginning ; for if this trade is an outrage upon justice, and only another name for fraud, robbery and murder, will any man urge that the legislature could possibly by any pledge whatever incur the obligation of being an accessory, or I may even say a principal, in the commission of such enormities, by sanctioning their continuance ? As well might an individual think himself bound by a promise to commit an...
Page 78 - It is scarcely possible to lay a duty on any one article, which may not, when first imposed, be said in some way to affect the property of individuals, and even of some entire classes of the community. If the laws respecting the slavetrade imply a contract for its perpetual continuance, I will venture to say, there does not pass a year without some act, equally pledging the faith of parliament to the perpetuating of some other branch of commerce.
Page 121 - No one will advance money to relieve those whose debts approach half the value of their property, nor even lend a moderate sum...
Page 121 - Every British merchant, holding securities on real estates, is filing bills in Chancery to foreclose, although, when he has obtained a decree, he hesitates to enforce it, because he must himself become proprietor of the plantation, of which, from fatal experience, he knows the consequences.
Page 121 - ... without a judgment in ejectment and release of errors, that at a moment's notice he may take out a writ of possession, and enter on the plantation of his unfortunate debtor. Sheriff's...
Page 78 - House think, that the slave-trade has received any such parliamentary sanction, as must place it more out of the jurisdiction of the legislature for ever after, than the other branches of our national commerce? I ask, is there any one regulation of any part of our commerce, which, if this argument be valid, may not equally be objected to, on the ground of its affecting some man's patrimony, some man's property, or some man's expectations? Let it never be forgotten, that the argument I am canvassing...
Page 122 - litigation in the courts of common law has diminished, it is " not from increased ability to perform contracts, but from " confidence having ceased, and no man parting with pro" perty but for an immediate payment of the consideration, " A faithful detail would have the appearance of a frightful
Page 117 - I cannot comprehend how the price of sugar would be more depressed by bringing these clayed sugars into the home market, than by leaving those raw sugars upon the market which are now manufactured in imitation of them and exported. The clayed sugars of Martinique are peculiarly calculated for making a certain description of refined sugar, known by the name of Hamburgh loaves, which circulate all over the continent with the greater facility, in the present state of things, because, being made in...

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