Eat People: And Other Unapologetic Rules for Game-Changing Entrepreneurs

Front Cover
Penguin, Feb 3, 2011 - Business & Economics - 272 pages
1 Review
How entrepreneurs find the next big thing-and make it huge.

The era of easy money and easy jobs is officially over. Today, we're all entrepreneurs, and the tides of change threaten to capsize anyone who plays it safe. Taking risks is the name of the game-but how can you tell a smart bet from a stupid gamble?

Andy Kessler has made a career out of seeing the future of business, as an analyst, investment banker, venture capitalist, and hedge fund manager. He evaluated the business potential of the likes of Steve Jobs and Michael Dell before they were Steve Jobs and Michael Dell. His eye for what's next is unparalleled.

Now Kessler explains how the world's greatest entrepreneurs don't just start successful companies-they overturn entire industries. He offers twelve surprising and controversial rules for these radical entrepreneurs, such as:

? Eat people: Get rid of worthless jobs to create more wealth for everybody
? Create artificial scarcity for virtual goods
? Trust markets to make better decisions than managers

Whether you're at a big corporation or running a small business, you're now an entrepreneur. Will you see change coming and grab on to opportunity or miss the boat?
 

What people are saying - Write a review

Review: Eat People: And Other Unapologetic Rules for Game-Changing Entrepreneurs

User Review  - Dave - Goodreads

one of the most thought provoking books on the new technology and how to look for real game changers. After a while it almost became a missive on Apple and Google, but the first half is very very interesting. i am on my second read. Read full review

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2011)

After turning $100 million into $1 billion riding the technology wave of the late 1990s, Andy Kessler recounted his experiences on Wall Street and in the trenches of the hedge fund industry in the books Wall Street Meat and Running Money (and its companion volume, How We Got Here). Though he has retired from actively managing other people's money, he remains a passionate and curious investor. Unable to keep his many opinions to himself, he contributes to the Wall Street Journal, Wired, and lots of Web sites on a variety of Wall Street and technology-related topics, and is often seen on CNBC, FOX, and CNN. He lives in Silicon Valley like all the other tech guys.

Bibliographic information