Eaters of the dead: the manuscript of Ibn Fadlan, relating his experiences with the Northmen in A.D. 922, Part 992

Front Cover
Ballantine Books, 1992 - Fiction - 278 pages
32 Reviews
"Crichton excells at storytelling."
NEWSDAY
In A.D. 922 Ibn Fadlan, the representative of the ruler of Bagdad, City of Peace, crosses the Caspian sea and journeys up the valley of the Volga on a mission to the King of Saqaliba. Before he arrives, he meets with Buliwyf, a powerful Viking chieftain who is summoned by his besieged relatives to the North. Buliwyf must return to Scandanavia and save his countrymen and families from the monsters of the mist....

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
5
4 stars
15
3 stars
5
2 stars
5
1 star
2

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - jerry-book - LibraryThing

This is a quick read. Crichton does a re-telling of the Beowulf story in order to make it exciting for the modern reader. I think he succeeds to some extent. I like having an Arab as the narrator ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - BenKline - LibraryThing

Crichton's attempt at Beowulf (and adjusting it a bit). Pretty lackluster overall and quite boring. So far my least favorite Crichton novel that I've read. (It's not a 'horrible' novel; its just kind ... Read full review

Contents

Section 1
17
Section 2
29
Section 3
41
Copyright

12 other sections not shown

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1992)

Michael Crichton, who died in Los Angeles on November 4, 2008, was a writer and filmmaker, best known as the author of " Jurassic Park" and the creator of "ER." His most recent novel, " Next, " about genetics and law, was published in December 2006.

Crichton graduated summa cum laude from Harvard College, received his MD from Harvard Medical School, and was a postdoctoral fellow at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies, researching public policy with Jacob Bronowski. He taught courses in anthropology at Cambridge University and writing at MIT. Crichton's 2004 bestseller, "State of Fear, " acknowledged the world was growing warmer, but challenged extreme anthropogenic warming scenarios. He predicted future warming at 0.8 degrees C. (His conclusions have been widely misstated.)

Crichton's interest in computer modeling went back forty years. His multiple-discriminant analysis of Egyptian crania, carried out on an IBM 7090 computer at Harvard, was published in the "Papers of the Peabody Museum "in 1966. His technical publications included a study of host factors in pituitary chromophobe adenoma, in "Metabolism, " and an essay on medical obfuscation in the "New England Journal of Medicine. "

Crichton's first bestseller, "The Andromeda Strain, " was published while he was still a medical student. He later worked full time on film and writing. One of the most popular writers in the world, his books have been translated into thirty-six languages, and thirteen have been made into films.

He had a lifelong interest in computers. His feature film "Westworld" was the first to employ computer-generated special effects back in 1973. Crichton's pioneering use of computer programs for film production earned him a Technical Achievement Academy Award in 1995.

Crichton won an Emmy Award, a Peabody Award, and a Writers Guild of America Award for" ER. "In 2002, a newly discovered ankylosaur was named for him: Crichtonsaurus bohlini. He had a daughter, Taylor, and lived in Los Angeles. Crichton remarried in 2005.

Bibliographic information