Eating Hints: Recipes and Tips for Better Nutrition During Cancer Treatment

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Yale New Haven Med Cntr
DIANE Publishing, Jul 1, 1990 - Cooking - 86 pages
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Prepared by members of the Yale-New Haven Medical Center, & is based on interviews with 99 cancer patients. The book has been written to help cancer patients, their families & friends find ways to eat well & enjoy eating, particularly those times when cancer treatment or the disease itself cause problems. Illustrated.
 

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Page 29 - ... nourishment during and after treatment for cancer. If you are usually the cook, here are some suggestions for saving time and energy in preparing meals. • Let someone else do the cooking when possible. • If you know that your recovery time from treatment or surgery is going to be longer than 1 or 2 days, prepare a helper list. Decide who can help you shop, cook, set the table, and clean up. Write it down, discuss it, and post it where it can easily be seen. If children help, plan a small...
Page 69 - Fluffy Fruit Gelatin 1 cup cooked or canned peaches with syrup 1 package red gelatin (3 oz.) 1 cup boiling water Blend fruit with syrup at high speed until smooth. Pour pureed fruit back into measuring cup and add enough syrup or water to make one cup. Dissolve gelatin in boiling water, pour into a bowl (deep enough to whip gelatin later). Stir in fruit puree. Cool. Refrigerate gelatin mixture until it piles softly, but is not firm. With cold beaters, whip the gelatin until foamy and doubled in volume....
Page 29 - ... good ideas. Cook larger batches to be frozen so you will have them for future use. Add instructions so that other people can help you. Use shopping lists. Keep them handy so that they can be used as guides either by you or other people. When making casseroles for freezing, only partially cook rice and macaroni products. They will cook further in the reheating process. Add 1/2 cup liquid to refrigerated or frozen casseroles when reheating because they can get dry during refrigeration. Remember...
Page 19 - Add to cream soups, baked potatoes, macaroni and cheese, vegetables, sauces, salad dressings, stews, baked meat, and fish. i Use as a topping for cakes, fruit, gelatin desserts, breads, and muffins. i Use as a dip for fresh fruits and vegetables. i For a good dessert, scoop it on fresh fruit, add brown sugar, and let it sit in the refrigerator for a while.
Page 29 - ... post it where it can easily be seen. If children help, plan a small reward for them. Write out menus. Choose things that you or your family can put together easily. Casseroles, TV dinners, hot dogs, hamburgers, and meals that you have prepared and frozen ahead are all good ideas. Cook larger batches to be frozen so you will have them for future use. Add instructions so that other people can help you. Use shopping lists. Keep them handy so that they can be used as guides either by you or other...
Page 10 - Mouth and Throat Problems The linings of the mouth and throat are among the most sensitive areas of the body. Cancer patients— especially those receiving chemotherapy or radiation treatments— often complain of soreness in these areas. These problems seem directly related to the treatment. Recent surgery in the head and neck area also may result in difficulty in chewing and swallowing. Remember that part of the healing process in this area of the body depends upon your eating well and drinking...
Page 29 - ... handy so that they can be used as guides either by you or other people. When making casseroles for freezing, only partially cook rice and macaroni products. They will cook further in the reheating process. Add 1/2 cup liquid to refrigerated or frozen casseroles when reheating because they can get dry during refrigeration. Remember that frozen casseroles take a long time to heat completely — at least 45 minutes in deep dishes in the oven. Don't be shy about accepting gifts of food and offers...
Page 52 - /4 cup vinegar 1 cup catsup 1 tbsp. soy sauce '/2 red or green pepper, cubed '/2 cup honey or brown sugar (packed) '/2 tsp. salt 1 can (8 oz.) pineapple chunks (optional) water 2 tbsp. cornstarch Mix all ingredients except cornstarch in saucepan. Bring to boil. Turn heat down to simmer, stirring occasionally and cook for at least 20 minutes to allow flavors to blend. Dissolve cornstarch in small amount of water. Add, stirring until thickened. (You can omit cornstarch and allow the sauce to thicken...
Page 51 - /2 small onion, sliced 1 or 2 frying peppers (1 bell pepper) cleaned and sliced 2 tbsp. oil 2 cups chopped fresh tomatoes or 1 can (15 oz.) tomatoes '/2 tsp. salt 2 tbsp. sugar 1 tsp. vinegar 1 tbsp. cornstarch water Fry onion and peppers in oil until onion is clear and pepper is spotted with brown. Add tomatoes, salt, sugar, and vinegar. Bring to boiling, turn down to simmer. Cover and cook at least 20 minutes to blend the flavors. Thicken just before serving with cornstarch dissolved in a little...
Page 76 - ... /8 tsp. ground cinnamon 2 tbsp. margarine '/4 cup hot water Grease 1 -quart baking dish. Arrange half of apples on bottom of dish. Follow with half of bread, then half of sugar. Repeat layers. Sprinkle cinnamon over top, cut margarine in pieces and lay them on top, finish by pouring hot water over all. Cover and bake at 350" for 30 minutes, uncover and bake 10 minutes longer.

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