Echo of an Angry God

Front Cover
Pan Australia, Feb 1, 1999 - Fiction - 544 pages
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Likoma Island in Lake Malawi is renowned throughout Africa for its exotic and treacherous beauty - and its secret history of human sacrifice, hidden treasure and unspeakable horror. A history that cannot be hidden forever.

Lana Devereaux travels to Malawi seeking the truth behind her fathers disappearance near Likoma Island fifteen years ago. But Lana soon finds herself caught in a web of deciet, passion and black magic that stretches back over two hundred years and has ramifications that reach well beyond the shores of Lake Malawi.

 

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Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
2
Section 3
13
Section 4
14
Section 5
18
Section 6
24
Section 7
27
Section 8
36
Section 26
246
Section 27
260
Section 28
268
Section 29
297
Section 30
319
Section 31
321
Section 32
332
Section 33
349

Section 9
39
Section 10
46
Section 11
50
Section 12
73
Section 13
91
Section 14
104
Section 15
120
Section 16
127
Section 17
144
Section 18
153
Section 19
160
Section 20
166
Section 21
174
Section 22
188
Section 23
215
Section 24
225
Section 25
242
Section 34
358
Section 35
374
Section 36
376
Section 37
383
Section 38
384
Section 39
413
Section 40
435
Section 41
471
Section 42
482
Section 43
502
Section 44
506
Section 45
509
Section 46
515
Section 47
523
Section 48
524
Section 49
529
Copyright

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About the author (1999)

Beverley Harper was born in Bulli on the New South Wales south coast. In 1967 she travelled to Africa, intending to spend one year there. She stayed twenty, returning to settle in Australia in 1988. Despite loving the northern tablelands, the memories of Africa have provided the inspiration for her best-selling novels and she visited that continent for research purposes once a year. Beverley Harper died of cancer in 2002. She rests at peace in the Africa she so loved. Her ashes lay by the Boteti River in Botswana, below a lodge called Leroo-la-Tau. It means footprints of lion.

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