Eclipse & O'Kelly: Being a Complete History So Far as is Known of that Celebrated English Thoroughbred Eclipse (1764-1789), of His Breeder the Duke of Cumberland & of His Subsequent Owners William Wildman, Dennis O'Kelly & Andrew O'Kelly, Now for the First Time Set Forth from the Original Authorities & Family Memoranda

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Dutton, 1907 - Eclipse (Horse) - 312 pages
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Page 54 - Man that is born of a woman," was chanted, not read; and the anthem, besides being immeasurably tedious, would have served as well for a nuptial. The real serious part was the figure of the Duke of Cumberland, heightened by a thousand melancholy circumstances. He had a dark brown adonis, and a cloak of black cloth, with a train of five yards.
Page 130 - There is so much good in the worst of us and so much bad in the best of us that it hardly behooves any of us to talk about the rest of us.
Page 54 - The real serious part was the figure of the Duke of Cumberland, heightened by a thousand melancholy circumstances. He had a dark brown adonis, and a cloak of black cloth, with a train of five yards. Attending the funeral of a father could not be pleasant : his leg extremely bad, yet forced to stand upon it near two hours; his face bloated and distorted with his late paralytic stroke, which has affected, too, one of his eyes, and placed over the mouth of the vault, into which, in all probability,...
Page 54 - Cumberland, who was sinking with heat, felt himself weighed down, and turning round, found it was the Duke of Newcastle standing upon his train, to avoid the chill of the marble.
Page 41 - Duke [Cumberland] ; and as the latter has taken a turn of gaming, Sandwich, to make his court — and fortune— carries a box and dice in his pocket ; and so they throw a main, whenever the hounds are at fault, ' upon every green hill and under every green tree.
Page 60 - Charles Fox, who had been running about the House talking to different persons and scarce listening to Burke, rose with amazing spirit and memory, answered both Lord North and Burke, ridiculed * the arguments of the former and confuted those of the latter with S.
Page 263 - Letters put in on Saturday Evenings are delivered in the Country on Sunday Morning. The dated Stamp, or if there are Two, that having the latest Hour, shews also the Time of the Day by which Letters are dispatched for Delivery from the Principal Offices.
Page 263 - Notes or others, payable to Bearer, to be cut in Half, and the Second Part not to be sent till the Receipt of the First is acknowledged. This Office is not liable to make good the Loss of any Property sent by Post.
Page 62 - ... Lieutenant of Ireland with Bunbury as his Secretary: the anticipated delights of this move were dashed when Kildare announced that Weymouth was so unpopular in Ireland that the Fitzgerald family could have no intimacy with the Bunburys, "which will intirely destroy my pleasure there." She was at Newmarket "to see the sweetest little horse run that ever was; his name is Gimcrack, he is delightful," when the administration fell, whereby Bunbury lost his prospective £4,000 a year job.
Page 40 - The Duke was very near taken, Horace tells Mann, " having, through his short sight, mistaken a body of French for his own people. He behaved as bravely as usual; but his prowess is so well established, that it grows time for him to exert other qualities of a general."t Three months later :

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