Eclipse of the Sun

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Ignatius Press, Sep 1, 1999 - Fiction - 857 pages
2 Reviews
In this fast-paced, reflective novel, (the second in a trilogy following Strangers and Sojourners) Michael O'Brien presents the dramatic tale of a family that finds itself in the path of a totalitarian government. Set in the near future, the story describes the rise of a police state in North America in which every level of society is infected with propaganda, confusion and disinformation. Few people are equipped to recognize what is happening because the culture of the Western world has been deformed by a widespread undermining of moral absolutes.

Against this background, the Delaney family of Swiftcreek, British Columbia, is struck a severe blow when the father of the family, the editor of a small newspaper which dares to speak the truth, is arrested by the dreaded Office of Internal Security. His older children flee into the forest of the northern interior, accompanied by their great-grandfather and an elderly priest, Father Andrei. Their little brother Arrow also becomes a fugitive as the government seeks to remove any witnesses, and eradicate all evidence of its ultimate goals.

As O'Brien draws together the several strands of the story into a frightening yet moving climax, he explores the heart of growing darkness in North America, examining events which have already occurred. The reader will take away from this disturbing book a number of urgent questions: Are we living in the decisive moment of history? How dire is our situation? Do we live in pessimistic dread, or a Christian realism founded on hope? This is a tale about the victory of the weak over the powerful, courage over terror, good over evil, and, above all, the triumph of love.

 

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User Review  - CatQuilt - LibraryThing

The first half dragged a little bit but then the pace picked up. My favorite chapter was the thirteenth, when some priests and the bishop started waking up to the danger (evil) around them and the laity and they, the priests and bishop, started basically doing their jobs. Read full review

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Contents

Preface
7
Flight
11
Dreamfields
21
Winnebago Country
54
Arion Empiricorum
98
A Dance upon Fair Waters
145
The Superstitious General and Many Other Adventures
200
The Queen of Junque
242
Hiatus in Arcadia Deo
489
Small Boys Can Gum Up the Works
534
A Parliament of Disasters
574
Eskimos Plane Crashes and Poker Chips
614
A Breath of Windigo
676
The Altar of Sacrifice
704
The Falcon and the Sparrow
745
Alices Misadventure in Wonderland
766

Nicolo Piccolo
276
Two Crowns
303
Life Politics Crime and Other Matters of Significance
348
Among the Exiles by the River Fraser
380
The Cities of the Plain
430
The Camp of the Saints
819
Epilogue
851
Authors Afterword
855
Maps
857
Copyright

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Page 84 - And his tail drew the third part of the stars of heaven, and did cast them to the earth : and the dragon stood before the woman which was ready to be delivered, for to devour her child as soon as it was born.
Page 84 - And a great portent appeared in heaven, a woman clothed with the sun, with the moon under her feet, and on her head a crown of twelve stars; she was with child and she cried out in her pangs of birth, in anguish for delivery.

About the author (1999)

O'Brien taught at the University of Arkansas until 1987. He is now Phillip R. Shriver Professor of History at Miami University of Ohio.

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