Economic Conditions Affecting Tobacco and Peanut Producers: Hearing Before the Subcommittee on Tobacco and Peanuts of the Committee on Agriculture, House of Representatives, One Hundredth Congress, First Session, March 23, 1987, Fayetteville, NC.

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Page 1 - OPENING STATEMENT OF HON. CHARLES ROSE, A REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS FROM THE STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA Mr. ROSE.
Page 110 - The federal Equal Credit Opportunity Act prohibits creditors from discriminating against credit applicants on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, sex, marital status, age (provided the applicant has the capacity to enter into a binding contract): because all or part of the applicant's income derives from any public assistance program: or because the applicant has in good faith exercised any right under the Consumer Credit Protection Act.
Page 2 - The present Administration in Washington provides a close parallel. It has either forgotten or it does not want to remember the infantry of our economic army.
Page 103 - Accounting by Debtors and Creditors for Troubled Debt Restructurings. Paragraph 2 of Statement 1 5 defines troubled debt restructuring as follows: A restructuring of debt constitutes a troubled debt restructuring ... if the creditor for economic or legal reasons related to the debtor's financial difficulties grants a concession to the debtor that it would not otherwise consider.
Page 85 - Miller and I will be glad to respond to any questions you or members of the subcommittee may wish to ask.
Page 4 - STATEMENT OF HON. H. MARTIN LANCASTER, A REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS FROM THE STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA Mr. LANCASTER.
Page 42 - ... much your coming here today. Mr. FINN. May I say, the views that I have expounded here are those of the entire committee of which I happen to be chairman. I have set out the qualifiactions of those persons and eacli of them is a far better lawyer than I. I am merely being their mouthpiece today and I thank you very much for the courtesy you have extended to me and to Mr. Stringer. Mr. CREECH. The subcommittee will reconvene at 2 :30 pm Thank you. (Whereupon, at 1 :13 pm, the subcommittee was...
Page 43 - Mr. Chairman, members of the subcommittee, I thank you for the opportunity to appear before...
Page 103 - We must drop the idea that change comes slowly. It does ordinarily — in part because we think it does. Today changes must come fast; and we must adjust our mental habits, so that we can accept comfortably the idea of stopping one thing and beginning another overnight. We must discard the idea that past routine, past ways of doing things, are probably the best ways. On the contrary, we must assume that there is probably a better way to do almost everything. We must stop assuming that a thing which...
Page 103 - ... their indebtedness. The banks do not resort to foreclosure if a farmer is doing his honest best; is applying the proceeds of production, over and above necessary living and operating expenses, to the payment of his loan; is taking proper care of the property; and has the capacity to work his way out of a reasonable debt under normal conditions. The application of this policy has enabled thousands of farmers to retain their farm homes which otherwise might have been lost. One of the greatest benefits...

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