Economics of Cities: Theoretical Perspectives

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, Feb 13, 2000 - Business & Economics - 452 pages
0 Reviews
Since cities are likely to play an even more predominant role in the global economy in the future than they do at present, it is important to understand how urban centers are created, grow, and function in the process of generating and distributing wealth. This integrated collection of essays exploring the new economic theory of cities assembles recent work by a number of the world's leading exponents in North America, the UK/Europe, and Japan. Topics investigated include cities and agglomeration, urban systems, urbanization and growth, and cities and factor markets. The perspectives the editors and contributors offer have strong connections with several branches of modern economics, including industrial organization, public economics, international trade, and endogenous growth and economic development.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

202336300
62
General Equilibrium Approaches
109
Intraindustry Specialization and Urban Development
138
A Monopolistic Competition Model of Urban
167
Dynamic Evolution of the Size Distribution
217
Urbanization Urban Structure and Growth
290
Urban Spread Beyond the City Edge
318
Unemployment in Cities
343
Cities and the Geography of Financial Centers
415
Index
447
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (2000)

Jacques-Francois Thisse, a fellow of the Econometric Society and of the Regional Science Association International, is Professor of Economics at the Universite Catholique de Louvain (Belgium) and the Higher School of Economics (Russia). He has published in numerous journals, including the American Economic Review, Econometrica, the Journal of Political Economy, the International Economic Review, Management Science, Exploration in Economic History, and the Journal of Economic Geography. He is the co-author of Discrete Choice Theory of Product Differentiation, Economic Geography, and Economic Geography and the Unequal Development of Regions. Professors Fujita and Thisse co-authored the first edition of Economics of Agglomeration: Cities, Industrial Location, and Regional Growth (Cambridge, 2002).

Bibliographic information