Economy and Society: A Study in the Integration of Economic and Social Theory

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Psychology Press, 1998 - Social Science - 322 pages

This volume is designed as a contribution to the synthesis of theory ineconomics and sociology. We believe that the degree of separationbetween these two disciplines separation emphasized by intellectualtraditions and present institutional arrangements arbitrarily concealsa degree of intrinsic intimacy between them which must be brought tothe attention of the respective professional groups.

 

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Contents

CURRENT SOCIO
1
Some Congruences Between Economic and Sociological
8
The Problem of Cost page
29
The Functional Differentiation of Society page
46
Double Interchanges at the Boundaries page
70
Some Economic Theories and the Boundary Processes
85
Keynesian modifications of the classical position p 87 Contribution
91
Examples in the economic literature of the economypolity balance
97
The Internal Structure of the Economy page
196
The Internal Boundary Relations of the Economy page
205
Restatement of the Trade Cycle page
219
The Investment Function page
233
A Note on Time Lags page
241
A Model of Economic Growth page
249
A Model of Institutional Change page
255
B Propagation of the Impetus to Change page
263

The Central Economic Institution page
104
Labour Occupation and the Contract of Employment page
114
Property Ownership and the Contract of Investment page
123
Factor Generalization and Economic Organization page
139
Institutionalization of Economic Values and the Motiva
175
Introduction page
185
Summary of the Model and its Application page
270
Some Historical and Theoretical Perspectives page
284
AND THE GENERAL THEORY
295
Conclusions
306
11
317
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About the author (1998)

Talcott Parsons, an American sociologist, introduced Max Weber to American sociology and became himself the leading theorist of American sociology after World War II. His Structure of Social Action (1937) is a detailed comparison of Alfred Marshall, Emile Durkheim, Max Weber, and Vilfredo Pareto. Parsons concluded that these four scholars, coming from contrasting backgrounds and from four different countries, converged, without their knowing of the others, on a common theoretical and methodological position that he called "the voluntaristic theory of action." Subsequently, Parsons worked closely with the anthropologists Clyde Kluckhohn, Elton Mayo, and W. Lloyd Warner, and the psychologists Gordon W. Allport and Henry A. Murray, to define social, cultural, and personality systems as the three main interpenetrative types of action organization. He is widely known for his use of four pattern variables for characterizing social relationships:affectivity versus neutrality, diffuseness versus specificity, particularism versus universalism, and ascription versus achievement.

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