Ecopsychology: Restoring the Earth, Healing the Mind

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Theodore Roszak, Mary E. Gomes, Allen D. Kanner
Sierra Club Books, 1995 - Environmental psychology - 338 pages
This pathfinding collection--by premier psychotherapists, thinkers, and eco-activists in the field--shows how the health of the planet is inextricably linked to the psychological health of humanity, individually and collectively. It is sure to become a definitive work for the ecopsychology movement. Forewords by Lester O. Brown and James Hillman.

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User Review  - AlexiFrancis - LibraryThing

I'm two thirds of the way through this book and have found it overall thought provoking and interesting. There's a wide selection of essays. However one author actually made me quite angry. He ... Read full review

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User Review  - thehatinthecat - LibraryThing

This anthology provides a good grounding in the emerging field of ecopsychology. Each writer provides insight into how our relationship to the earth can and does effect our psyschological health. I ... Read full review

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About the author (1995)

Theodore Roszak was born in Chicago, Illinois on November 15, 1933. He received a B.A. from UCLA and a Ph.D. in English history from Princeton University. He taught at Stanford University, the University of British Columbia, San Francisco State University, and California State University, Hayward. His only lengthy departure from academia was when he served as editor of Peace News in London during 1964 and 1965. His writings and social philosophy have been controversial since the publication of The Making of a Counter Culture in 1968. His other nonfiction works include Where the Wasteland Ends, Person/Planet, The Voice of the Earth, The Cult of Information, and Ecopsychology: Healing the Mind, Restoring the Earth. He also wrote several novels including Flicker, The Devil and Daniel Silverman, and Memoirs of Elizabeth Frankenstein, which won the Tiptree Award. He died of cancer on July 5, 2011 at the age of 77.

James Hillman was born in Atlantic City, New Jersey on April 12, 1926. He attended the School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University for two years before joining the Navy's Hospital Corps in 1944. He studied English literature in Paris at the Sorbonne and graduated with a degree in mental and moral science from Trinity College in Dublin. In 1953, he moved to Zurich and enrolled at the C. G. Jung Institute. In 1959, he became the director of studies at the institute and stayed in that position for the next 10 years. He wrote over 20 books including Suicide and the Soul, Re-Visioning Psychology, and The Soul's Code. He died due to complications of bone cancer on October 27, 2011 at the age of 85.

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