Edgar Huntly, Or, Memoirs of a Sleep-walker

Front Cover
Penguin, Jan 1, 1988 - Fiction - 285 pages
2 Reviews
One of the first American Gothic novels, Edgar Huntly (1787) mirrors the social and political temperaments of the postrevolutionary United States.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - markbstephenson - LibraryThing

This features some riveting action scenes and some ingenious plot surprises. The Irishman Clithero is a memorable but exceedingly problematical character. I got the impression that Brown brought this to an end in a semi-complete form, perhaps having tired of it. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - aethercowboy - LibraryThing

I found this book to be particularly dry. While normally an astute reader whose triumphs include Finnegans Wake, Gravity's Rainbow, and Atlas Shrugged, I found it difficult to follow the narrative ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

TO THE PUBLIC
v
CHAPTER ONE
vii
CHAPTER TWO
xv
CHAPTER FOUR
8
CHAPTER FIVE
17
CHAPTER SIX
29
CHAPTER SEVEN
34
CHAPTER EIGHT
43
CHAPTER SEVENTEEN
138
CHAPTER EIGHTEEN
147
CHAPTER NINETEEN
158
CHAPTER TWENTY
169
CHAPTER TWENTYONE
178
CHAPTER TWENTYTWO
188
CHAPTER TWENTYTHREE
197
CHAPTER TWENTYFOUR
206

CHAPTER NINE
60
CHAPTER TEN
69
CHAPTER ELEVEN
78
CHAPTER TWELVE
86
CHAPTER THIRTEEN
98
CHAPTER FOURTEEN
107
CHAPTER FIFTEEN
117
CHAPTER SIXTEEN
125
CHAPTER TWENTYFIVE
216
CHAPTER TWENTYSIX
226
CHAPTER TWENTYSEVEN
234
TO MR SARSEFIELD
247
TO THE SAME
249
TO EDGAR HUNTLY
257
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1988)

Charles Brockden Brown (1771-1810) was born to a merchant Quaker family in Philadelphia, and was educated at Robert Proud's school. In his early twenties he committed himself to literature and avidly read the latest models from England and Europe--especially Rousseau, Bage, Godwin, Southey, and Coleridge. By 1795 Brown was earnestly devoted to fiction; once engaged, he composed at a breakneck pace, publishing between 1797 and 1802 seven romances, a long pro-feminist dialogue, and numerous sketches and tales. Four of those romances earned him the perhaps dubious title of "father of the American novel"--Wieland (1798), Ormond (1799), Arthur Mervyn (Part 1, 1799; Part II, 1800), and between those two parts, Edgar Huntly (1799). All four are remarkably sophisticated moral, psychological, and political allegories that burned into the artistic consciousness of Poe, Hawthorne, Fenimore Cooper, and Melville. By the 1820s, a decade after his death, Brown was ranked with Washington Irving and Fenimore Cooper as the embodiment of American literary genius, the first American writer to successfully bridge the gulf between entertainment and art in fiction.

Norman S. Grabo introduced and helped edit the authoritative edition of Arthur Mervyn, and is the author of The Coincidental Art of Charles Brockden Brown and the first book-length study of America's premier colonial poet, Edward Taylor. He writes widely on early American aesthetics, and is at present Chapman Professor of English Language and Literature at the University of Tulsa.

Bibliographic information