The Edinburgh Medical and Surgical Journal, Volume 68

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publisher not identified, 1847 - Medicine
 

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Page 155 - What is the law respecting alleged crimes committed by persons afflicted with insane delusion in respect of one or more particular subjects or persons: as, for instance, where at the time of the commission of the alleged crime the accused knew he was acting contrary to law, but did the act complained of with a view, under the influence of insane delusion, of redressing or revenging some supposed grievance or injury, or of producing some Supposed public benefit?
Page 155 - That before a plea of insanity should be allowed, undoubted evidence ought to be adduced that the accused was of diseased mind, and that at the time he committed the act he was not conscious of right or wrong.
Page 253 - How small of all that human hearts endure, That part which laws or kings can cause or cure.
Page 155 - ... at the time of the commission of the alleged crime, the accused knew he was acting contrary to law, but did the act complained of with a view, under the influence of insane delusion, of redressing or revenging some supposed grievance or injury, or of producing some supposed public benefit ?' " In answer to which question, assuming that your lordships...
Page 155 - What are the proper questions to be submitted to the jury, where a person alleged to be afflicted with insane delusion respecting one or more particular subjects or persons, is charged with the commission of a crime (murder, for example), and insanity is set up as a defence?" And, thirdly, "In what terms ought the question to be left to the jury as to the prisoner's state of mind at the time when the act was committed?
Page 156 - To which question the answer must of course depend on the nature of the delusion: but, making the same assumption as we did before, namely, that he labours under such partial delusion only, and is not in other respects insane, we think he must be considered in the same situation as...
Page 156 - If the delusion were only partial, the party accused was equally liable with a person of sane mind. If the accused killed another in self-defence, he would be entitled to an acquittal, but if the crime were committed for any supposed injury, he would then be liable to the punishment awarded by the laws to his crime.
Page 406 - ... the moistened surfaces, taking care that not only every part of the inflamed skin be touched, but the surrounding healthy skin, to the extent of an inch, or more. The caustic must...
Page 163 - Individuals laboring under this disorder are capable of reasoning or supporting an argument, on any subject within their sphere of knowledge that may be presented to them, and they often display great ingenuity in giving reasons for their eccentric conduct, and in accounting for and justifying the state of moral feeling, under which they appear to exist.

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