Educability and Group Differences, Volume 61

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Routledge, Dec 8, 2011 - Education - 407 pages
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Jensen is a controversial figure, largely for his conclusions based on his and other research regarding the causes of race based differences in intelligence and in this book he develops more fully the argument he formulated in his controversial Harvard Education Review article 'How Much Can We Boost IQ and Scholastic Achievement?'. In a wide-ranging survey of the evidence he argues that measured IQ reveals a strong hereditary component and he argues that the system of education which assumes an almost wholly environmentalist view of the causes of group differences capitalizes on a relatively narrow category of human abilities.

Since its original publication the controversy surrounding Jensen's ideas has continued as successive generations of psychologists, scientists and policy-makers have grappled with the same issues.

 

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Contents

Preface
1
1 Subpopulation differences in educability
28
2 Current technical misconceptions and obfuscations
42
3 Intelligence and educability
72
4 The heritability of scholastic achievement
103
5 Betweengroups heritability
125
6 Social class differences in intelligence
151
7 Race differences in intelligence
158
13 Inequality of schooling
255
14 Teacher expectancy
260
15 Motivational factors
265
16 Language deprivation
277
17 Culturebiased tests
291
18 Sensorimotor differences
321
19 Physical environment and mental development
330
20 Recapitulation
352

8 Multiple and partial correlation methods
202
9 Intelligence of racial hybrids
219
10 Environmental rationalization versus environmental research
231
11 Equating for socioeconomic variables
235
12 Accentuated environmental inequalities
243
Appendix on heritability
366
References
376
Author index
397
Subject index
402
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