Education in Ethiopia: Strengthening the Foundation for Sustainable Progress

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World Bank Publications, 2005 - Education - 285 pages
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"With the end of civil war in 1991, Ethiopia's government launched a New Education and Training Policy in 1994 which, by the early 2000s, had already produced remarkable results. The gross enrollment ratio rose from 20 to 62 percent in primary education between 1993-94 and 2001-02; and in secondary and higher education it climbed, respectively, from 8 to 12 percent and from 0.5 to 1.7 percent. Yet the government can hardly afford to rest on its laurels. Primary education is still not universal, and already there are concerns about plummeting educational quality and the growing pressures to expand post-primary education.

Addressing these challenges will require more resources, both public and private. Yet money alone is insufficient. Focusing on primary and secondary education, Education in Ethiopia argues for wise tradeoffs in the use of resources-a result that will often require reforming the arrangements for service delivery. These changes, in turn, need to be fostered by giving lower levels of government more leeway to adapt central standards-such as those for teacher recruitment and school construction-to local conditions, including local resource constraints; and by strengthening accountability for results at all levels of administration in the education system."

 

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Contents

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Page 194 - Statistically significant at the 10 percent level " = Statistically significant at the 5 percent level. '" = Statistically significant at the 1 percent level.
Page 1 - Goals (MDGs) include eight explicit objectives for reducing poverty: ( 1 ) eradicating extreme poverty and hunger; (2) achieving universal primary education; (3) promoting gender equality and empowering women; (4) reducing child mortality; (5) improving maternal health; (6) combating HIV/ AIDS, malaria, and other diseases; (7) ensuring environmental sustainability; and (8) developing a global partnership for development.
Page 3 - ... and semimythical area that did not exactly correspond to the modern country. Ethiopia first appears in written history as the Aksumite (or Axumite) Empire, which was probably established around the beginning of the Christian era, although national tradition attributes the foundation of the empire to Menelik I, the son of King Solomon and the Queen of Sheba. Christianity was introduced in the 4th century by Frumentius of Tyre, who was appointed bishop of the Ethiopian diocese by Patriarch Athanasius...
Page 187 - White (1980) hetcroskedasticity robust covariance estimator. + = statistically significant at the 10% level. * = statistically significant at the 5% level.
Page 5 - ... literacy rate jumped from 73 percent to 91 percent. Notably, the benefits of economic growth were widely shared throughout the population. Incomes of the poorest fifth of the population grew just as fast as average incomes, and poverty rates fell substantially in each country. In Indonesia, for example, the share of the population living below the poverty line fell from 60 percent in the 1960s to under 15 percent in 1996. 13. McKinnon and Pill (1996, p. 35). Another notable example is Diaz-Alejandro...
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Page 281 - The Primacy of Education." Research Program in Development Studies, Princeton University, Princeton NJ. www.wws.princeton.edu/~rpds/downloads/primacy-ofedu.pdf Christie, Clive J (1998): Southeast Asia in the Twentieth Century. A Reader. IB Taurus, London. Cloud, John (2002): "Who's Ready For College?

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