Educational Foundations: A Text Book for the Professional Teacher, Volume 12

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A.S. Barnes, 1900 - Education
 

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Page 233 - For woman is not undevelopt man, But diverse : could we make her as the man, Sweet love were slain : his dearest bond is this, Not like to like, but like in difference. Yet in the long years liker must they grow ; The man be more of woman, she of man...
Page 52 - Yet mark'd I where the bolt of Cupid fell: It fell upon a little western flower,— Before, milk-white, now purple with love's wound,— And maidens call it love-in-idleness.
Page 172 - MEN in great place are thrice servants: servants of the sovereign or state; servants of fame; and servants of business. So as they have no freedom ; neither in their persons, nor in their actions, nor in their times. It is a strange desire, to seek power and to lose liberty: or to seek power over others and to lose power over a man's self.
Page 210 - Whate'er adorns The princely dome, the column, and the arch, The breathing marbles and the sculptur'd gold, Beyond the proud possessor's narrow claim, His tuneful breast enjoys. For him the Spring Distils her dews, and from the silken gem Its lucid leaves unfolds ; for him the hand Of Autumn tinges every fertile branch With blooming gold, and blushes like the morn.
Page 362 - The time in which he lived had reason to lament his obstinacy of silence, 'for he was,' says Steele, 'above all men in that talent called humour, and enjoyed it in such perfection that I have often reflected, after a night spent with him apart from all the world, that I had had the pleasure of conversing with an intimate acquaintance of Terence and Catullus, who had all their wit and nature, heightened with humour more exquisite and delightful than any other man ever possessed.
Page iii - Instruction should proceed from the known to the unknown, from the simple to the complex, from the concrete to abstract notions, from analysis to synthesis.
Page 266 - Whoever wishes to attain an English style, familiar but not coarse, and elegant but not ostentatious, must give his days and nights to the volumes of Addison...
Page 239 - Woe unto you, Scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites! for ye are like unto whited sepulchres, which indeed appear beautiful outward, but are within full of dead men's bones, and of all uncleanness.
Page 201 - Just tells the pensive pilgrim where it lay. Mute is the bell that rung at peep of dawn, Quickening my truant feet across the lawn : Unheard the shout that rent the noontide air When the slow dial gave a pause to care. Up springs, at every step, to claim a tear, Some little friendship formed and cherished here ; And not the lightest leaf, but trembling teems With golden visions and romantic dreams.
Page 109 - Fast by the oracle of God, I thence Invoke thy aid to my adventurous song, That with no middle flight intends to soar Above the Aonian mount, while it pursues Things unattempted yet in prose or rhyme.

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