Edward Albee's Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?

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Dramatists Play Service Inc, 1990 - Drama - 102 pages
Audiences at the original Broadway production of Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? were keenly aware that they were witnessing the transformation of a promising playwright into a figure of world importance, through a play clearly destined to become a modern classic. Time has richly borne out this view. This dazzling work of gut-wrenching dark comedy presents perhaps the most memorable of married couples, George and Martha, in a searing night of dangerous fun and games with a pawnlike other couple who innocently become their weapons in the savaging of each other and of their life together. By the evening's end, a stunning, almost unbearable revelation provides a climactic shock of recognition at the bond and bondage of their love. In its superlative construction, in its mastery of razor-honed dialogue and emotional crescendo, and above all in its power to strip away layer after layer of a social pretense to expose the naked nerve of truth, Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? is one of the most riveting and unforgettable experiences of the American theater.
 

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Contents

I
7
II
42
III
78
Copyright

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About the author (1990)

Edward Albee was born in Virginia on March 12, 1928. His first produced play, The Zoo Story, opened in Berlin in 1959 before playing at the Provincetown Playhouse in Greenwich Village the following year. In 1960, it won the Vernon Rice Memorial Award. In 1962, his Broadway debut, Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, won a Tony Award for best play. It was adapted into a film starring Richard Burton and Elizabeth Taylor in 1966. He wrote about 30 plays during his lifetime including The Sandbox, The American Dream, The Death of Bessie Smith, All Over, and The Play About the Baby. He won the Pulitzer Prize three times for A Delicate Balance in 1966, Seascape in 1975, and Three Tall Women in 1991. Three Tall Women also received Best Play awards from the New York Drama Critics Circle and Outer Critics Circle. He won another Tony Award for The Goat, or Who Is Sylvia? and a Lifetime Achievement Tony Award in 2005. He had died after a short illness on September 16, 2016 at the age of 88.

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