Edward Barry: a romance of the South Seas

Front Cover
St. Botolph Society, 1900 - 305 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 308 - It is a story of Bohemia, but written with the healthy enthusiasm of youth for all there is in life. Much of the greatest the world has produced in art and literature has been born of the Montmarte and the Quartier Latin, but little of worth has been written about them. Murger's "La Vie de Boheme
Page 311 - This book is realistic. Some say that it is brutally so. But the realism is that of Flaubert, and not of Zola. There is no plain speaking for the sake of plain speaking. Every detail is justified in the fact that it illuminates either the motives or the actions of the man and woman who here stand revealed. It is deadly true. The author holds the mirror up to nature, and the reader, as he sees his own experiences duplicated in passage after passage, has something of the same sensation as all of us...
Page 89 - And now you can all go to hell till the morning. I'm going to sleep." So saying, he flung himself upon the skylight, and in a few minutes was snoring in a drunken slumber. Rawlings sauntered up on deck a few minutes later, and stood watching the progress of the brig through the calm and glassy water, for Barry had lowered one of the boats, and the crew were towing her clear of the outlying horn of the reef. The wild, half-naked savages who had just come on board were sitting or lying on the main-deck,...
Page 309 - THE MAKING OF A SAINT for the first publication to carry the new imprint. "THE MAKING OF A SAINT is a romance of mediaeval Italy. None can resent the frankness and apparent brutality of the scenes through which the hero and his companions of both sexes are made to pass, and many will yield ungrudging praise to the author's vital handling of the truth." — Boston Herald. "An exceedingly strong story of original motive and design. . . . The scenes are imbued with a spirit of frankness . . . and in...
Page 311 - This book is realistic. Some say that it is brutally so. But the realism is that of Flaubert, and not of Zola. There is no plain speaking for the sake of plain speaking. Every detail is justified in the fact that it illuminates either the motives or the actions of the man and woman who here stands revealed.
Page 309 - There he becomes involved in its politics, intrigues, and feuds, and finally joins an uprising of the townspeople against their lord. None can resent the frankness and apparent brutality of the scenes through which the hero and his companions of both sexes are made to pass, and many will yield ungrudging praise to the author's vital handling of the truth.
Page 311 - Reading these pages is like being out in the country on a dark night in a storm. Suddenly a flash of lightning comes and every detail of your surroundings is revealed.
Page 312 - This novel stands as a book of real worth, a sincere criticism of life, and a poet's interpretation of the life of man and the wonder of the universe of God. "This is Mr. Frenssen's best-known work, and one that could not have too many readers in this country. The simple and fine story of Jorn's efforts to save the family acres has a measure of philosophy and poetic vision that lift it quite above any other study in recent times." — New York Evening Post. HOLYLAND. Translated by MA Hamilton. THE...
Page 313 - The high purpose of 'What Allah Wills' lifts it out of the realm of ordinary romance and stamps it as the most important novel of the Moslem world since Robert Hichens* 'Garden of Allah.
Page 172 - From these shallow lakes the water is evaporated, so that in the antumn the bottoms are dry and covered with a white incrustation which looks much like water in the distance. One of these lakes still contained water and seems to have a fair supply at all seasons. It is almost a mile in length and half a mile in width. In the spring these lakes are quite large and are filled by the overflow of the branches of the Big Laramie, which are greatly swollen by the melting snows. Great quantities of fish...

Bibliographic information