Effective Health Risk Messages: A Step-By-Step Guide

Front Cover
SAGE, Apr 12, 2001 - Education - 216 pages
0 Reviews

Winner of the Distinguished Book Award by the Applied Communication Division of the National Communication Association, 2001

Effective Health Risk Messages provides step-by-step instructions for developing theoretically based campaigns that work. Students and readers will learn about message development theories, formative and summative evaluation, and even basic research designs for evaluating your campaign. Worksheets are provided at the end of each chapter to provide readers with hands-on, practical experiences in developing effective health risk messages. This book is suitable for practitioners, researchers, and students alike, and can act as a stand-alone text or supplementary text for persuasion, public health, advertising, and marketing classes.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

The Extended Parallel Process Model
23
Useful Concepts from Other Theories
33
The Risk Behavior Diagnosis Scale
67
Some Additional Guidelines
75
Conclusion
93
Gathering Data for the Evaluation
100
Sample Size
106
Getting the Message Out
123
Appendix
135
Glossary
147
References
199
Suggested Readings
207
About the Authors
215
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 202 - The role of esteem and coping in response to a threat communication.
Page 205 - KH (1984). The effects of risk probability, outcome severity, efficacy of protection and access to protection on decision making: A further test of protection motivation theory. Social Behavior and Personality, 12, 121-125.
Page 205 - Boyle, GJ (1984). Effects of viewing a road trauma film on emotional and motivational factors. Accident Analysis and Prevention, 16, 383-386.
Page 213 - I0 editorial boards and has served as expert consultant to the National Libraries of Medicine, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), and other agencies.

References to this book