Effective Business Letters: Their Requirements and Preparation, with Specific Directions for the Various Types of Letters Commonly Used in Business

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Ronald Press, 1916 - Commercial correspondence - 420 pages
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Page 410 - Maryland Md. Massachusetts Mass. Michigan Mich. Minnesota Minn. Mississippi Miss. Missouri Mo. Montana Mont. Nebraska Nebr. Nevada Nev. New Hampshire NH New Jersey NJ Staff Abbreviation New Mexico N.
Page 410 - Nevada, Nev. New Hampshire, NH New Jersey, NJ New Mexico, N. Mex. New York, NY North Carolina, NC North Dakota, N. Dak.
Page 164 - ... the better acquaintance between us thus brought about will be beneficial to yourselves as well as to us. It hardly requires argument to support the proposition that when a merchant frequently finds it inconvenient to pay at maturity, a frank disclosure of his financial condition, if his affairs are on a substantial basis, will result to his advantage. If your merchandise has not recently been inventoried, your conservative estimate of its value will answer. Precise and complete figures of the...
Page 13 - A | letter which is so short that it gives too little attention to each idea is harder to understand than a longer letter, and therefore really | takes more of the reader's time. If it is so short as to omit courtesy, it neglects its opportunity. A few words extra or another sentence add little | or nothing to the cost of the letter and may add to its effectiveness.
Page 12 - Overparagraphing is ahnost as bad as underparagraphing. A general rule for ordinary letters is that a paragraph should | not be over six lines long and that most paragraphs should be shorter. This depends somewhat on the nature of | the letter. Begin with the subject of the letter, and take up the material in a definite arrangement. If there | is more than one subject, begin with what is most pleasing to the reader. A chronological arrangement is a natural | one. In a letter containing both facts...
Page 197 - According to our bookkeeper's report, the past-due bills in your account amount to $ and as the invoices of ... . are still unpaid, we are at a loss to understand why our several urgent letters asking for a settlement seem to have been altogether ignored. If you realize that you have not yet paid for goods sold to you on 60-day terms more than...
Page 147 - ... most pleasant, and the reports from the agencies also indicate that you are fortunate in your standing. You are no doubt familiar with such blanks as the enclosed, and with the policy which we maintain for the sake of our customers not less than ourselves, of going direct to the customer for more detailed information about his business than the agencies oan give.
Page 38 - Write plainly the name of the person addressed, street and number, or number of rural route, post office, and State in full. When the name of the State is abbreviated, frequently Va. and Pa., Md. and Ind., Colo, and Cal., Miss, and Minn., and others are confused and mail missent, as post offices of the same name are located in several different States.
Page 410 - Arizona Ariz. Arkansas Ark. California Cal. Colorado Colo. Connecticut Conn. Delaware Del. District of Columbia. . . . DC Florida Fla. Georgia Ga.
Page 197 - ... are still unpaid, we are at a loss to understand why our several urgent letters asking for a settlement seem to have been altogether ignored. If you realize that you have not yet paid for goods sold to you on 60-day terms more than months ago we think you will concede our treatment of your account has been exceedingly considerate and that we are entitled to be paid without further delay, expense, or annoyance. We shall be greatly obliged if you will promptly forward a remittance of...

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