Efficiency, Equality and the Ownership of Property (Routledge Revivals)

Front Cover
Routledge, Apr 26, 2012 - Business & Economics - 92 pages
0 Reviews

First published in 1964, this is a study of the extreme inequalities in the ownership of property, in economies across the globe. Professor Meade examines in depth the economic, demographic and social factors which lead to such inequalities. He considers a wide range of remedial policies – educational development, reformed death duties and capital taxes, demographic policies, trade union action, the socialization of property, the development of a property-owning democracy, the expansion of the welfare state.

The argument is expressed in precise analytical terms, but the main exposition is free of mathematics and technical jargon and is designed for the interested layman as well as the economist.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

List of Tables
10
I Economic Efficiency and Distributional Justice
11
II The Present Position in the Developed Countries
27
III The Trade Union State
35
IV The Welfare State
38
V A PropertyOwning Democracy
40
VI A Socialist State
66
VII Conclusion
75
Appendix I The Distribution of Personal Incomes The United Kingdom 1959
78
Appendix II The Accumulation of Personal Property
82
Appendix III A Proposed Scale for a new Legacy and Gift Duty
88
Index
91
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2012)

J. E. Meade is Emeritus Professor of Political Economy at the University of Cambridge. From 1947 to 1957 he was Professor of Commerce at the London School of Economics, producing the work in international trade and payments for which he was awarded the Nobel Prize in 1977. Since 1957, he has worked in Cambridge as Professor of Political Economy, as Senior Research Fellow at Christ's College, and finally in retirement where he has produced studies on a wide range of topics including economic growth, fiscal policy, distribution of income and wealth, and the control of wages and prices.

Bibliographic information