Egypt, a poem by a traveller [H. Salt.].

Front Cover
1824
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 47 - Genii, with heads of birds, hawks, ibis, drakes, Of lions, foxes, cats, fish, frogs, and snakes, Bulls, rams, and monkeys, hippopotami ; With knife in paw, suspended from the sky, Gods germinating men, and men turn'd gods...
Page 44 - Must crumble into dust ere all be past. x. Hail to thee, lonely valley of the dead ! Compass'd with rugged mountains, where the tread Of man is rarely heard, save his who roams From foreign lands to visit thy lone tombs — Tombs of long perish'd kings, who thus remote Their sepulchres have set in barren spot, Where not a blade of verdure ever grew : To me thou hast a charm for aye that's new, . For I have cast, for days, weeks, months, my lot Among thy rocks secluded — oft at night Hath the still...
Page 5 - ... Nile, and scarcely any date-trees and villages. I often dined under the shade of an acacia, or sycamore, the repose duing the excessive heat of the midday sun being a relief to the men and refreshing to myself ; and frequently have I, when " Lazy resting 'neath some shady tree," been delighted to " List to the rustling leaves above, and see The turtle cooing to his gentle bride, As fond she nestles happy by his side, Or view the blue-winged pigeon's idle brood Disport and wanton on the summer...
Page 55 - THIS Poem was printed with a view to divert the Author's attention whilst suffering under severe affliction, as well as to give encouragement to a very worthy man, the Printer. It is the first English work carried through the press in Alexandria ; and, as the compositor was entirely ignorant of the language in which it is written, the difficulties that existed in correcting the proof-sheets may be easily imagined.
Page 44 - Compass'd with rugged mountains, where the tread Of man is rarely heard, save his who roams From foreign lands to visit thy lone tombs — Tombs of long perish'd kings, who thus remote Their sepulchres have set in barren spot, Where not a blade of verdure ever grew : To me thou hast a charm for aye that's new, For I have cast, for days, weeks, months, my lot Among thy rocks secluded — oft at night Hath the still valley met my awe-struck sight, Lighted by silver moon that seem'd to cast A lingering...
Page 17 - Fabrics immqrtal ! if to work of man Such boast be lawful. Come, and let us scan Their form, position, structure : now descending Through lonely passages with dubious light, And now our steps in strange emotion bending To lofty galleries, whose fearful height Mocks the dim taper's radiance, 'till we come Unto a desolate chamber, and a tomb Of polish...
Page 7 - Or listen to the hum of water-wheels By uncouth oxen turn'd, a grateful sound.
Page 42 - Visit we next Karnak across the plain, Smiling with richest verdure, ripening grain, Where rows of andro-sphinxes indicate, In mutilated grandeur, the high state Of old Diospolis, whose ruins cast Ev'n still a vivid radiance o'er the past. Columns and temples, porticoes sublime, O'erpower the astonish'd senses with their vast And solid masses unsubdued by time.

Bibliographic information