Eight Cousins

Front Cover
The Floating Press, Sep 1, 2010 - Juvenile Fiction - 348 pages
22 Reviews
If you loved Little Women, Louisa May Alcott's moving account of the upbringing of four sisters in nineteenth-century Massachusetts, don't miss Eight Cousins, a similarly stirring novel that follows the childhood and young adulthood of plucky protagonist Rose Campbell, the sole female child born to her extended family. Rose struggles to fit in with her seven male cousins, and learns a thing or two about genteel Boston Brahmin society along the way.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - SueinCyprus - LibraryThing

Rose, a young orphaned teenager, lives with two great-aunts who love her but have little idea how to help her stay healthy and mature. Her Uncle Alec is her legal guardian, and decides to give her ... Read full review

A beautiful children's book.

User Review  - Leah - Christianbook.com

Set in nineteenth-century Boston, Louisa May Alcott’s Eight Cousins—originally published serially—follows a year in the life of young Rose Campbell. Rose, a sweet and delicate thirteen-year-old, is ... Read full review

Contents

Preface
5
Chapter 1 Two Girls
6
Chapter 2 The Clan
18
Chapter 3 Uncles
34
Chapter 4 Aunts
51
Chapter 5 A Belt and a Box
63
Chapter 6 Uncle Alecs Room
78
Chapter 7 A Trip to China
92
Chapter 13 Cosey Corner
172
Chapter 14 A Happy Birthday
181
Chapter 15 EarRings
199
Chapter 16 Bread and Button Holes
215
Chapter 17 Good Bargains
229
Chapter 18 Fashion and Physiology
245
Chapter 19 Brother Bones
259
Chapter 20 Under the Mistletoe
271

Chapter 8 And What Came of It
106
Chapter 9 Phebes Secret
118
Chapter 10 Roses Sacrifice
136
Chapter 11 Poor Mac
147
Chapter 12 The Other Fellows
160
Chapter 21 A Scare
288
Chapter 22 Something to Do
302
Chapter 23 PeaceMaking
316
Chapter 24 Which?
333
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About the author (2010)

Louisa May Alcott was born in Germantown, Pennsylvania, in 1832. Two years later, she moved with her family to Boston and in 1840 to Concord, which was to remain her family home for the rest of her life. Her father, Bronson Alcott, was a transcendentalist and friend of Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau. Alcott early realized that her father could not be counted on as sole support of his family, and so she sacrificed much of her own pleasure to earn money by sewing, teaching, and churning out potboilers. Her reputation was established with Hospital Sketches (1863), which was an account of her work as a volunteer nurse in Washington, D.C. Alcott's first works were written for children, including her best-known Little Women (1868--69) and Little Men: Life at Plumfield with Jo's Boys (1871). Moods (1864), a "passionate conflict," was written for adults. Alcott's writing eventually became the family's main source of income. Throughout her life, Alcott continued to produce highly popular and idealistic literature for children. An Old-Fashioned Girl (1870), Eight Cousins (1875), Rose in Bloom (1876), Under the Lilacs (1878), and Jack and Jill (1881) enjoyed wide popularity. At the same time, her adult fiction, such as the autobiographical novel Work: A Story of Experience (1873) and A Modern Mephistopheles (1877), a story based on the Faust legend, shows her deeper concern with such social issues as education, prison reform, and women's suffrage. She realistically depicts the problems of adolescents and working women, the difficulties of relationships between men and women, and the values of the single woman's life.

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