Eight Cousins: Or, The Aunt-hill

Front Cover
Roberts Brothers, 1876 - Cousins - 290 pages
3 Reviews
Orphaned Rose Campbell finds it difficult to fit in when she goes to live with her six aunts and seven mischievous boy cousins.
 

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Review: Eight Cousins

User Review  - Rose - Christianbook.com

One of my all-time favourites; I would recommend this book to anybody!!!! It's so sweet and wholesome; I love the language too. The sequel, "Rose in Bloom", is even better and by far my favourite classic I've ever read. Read full review

Review: Eight Cousins

User Review  - Jenny - Christianbook.com

I absolutly love this book!!! And even though I am in college it is still one of my all time favorites. In fact I am rereading it right now. You should get it!!! Read full review

Contents

I
1
II
10
IV
23
V
37
VI
47
VII
59
VIII
71
IX
84
XVI
149
XVII
165
XVIII
179
XIX
191
XX
204
XXI
216
XXII
226
XXIII
241

X
93
XI
108
XII
118
XIV
129
XV
141

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Page 83 - Far and few, far and few, Are the lands where the Jumblies live: Their heads are green, and their hands are blue; And they went to sea in a sieve.
Page 83 - And all night long they sailed away; And when the sun went down, They whistled and warbled a moony song To the echoing sound of a coppery gong, In the shade of the mountains brown.
Page 198 - I have read about them, Geordie, and though they are better than the others, I am not satisfied with these optical delusions, as I call them. Now, I put it to you, boys, is it natural for lads from fifteen to eighteen to command ships, defeat pirates, outwit smugglers, and so cover themselves with glory, that Admiral Farragut invites them to dinner, saying : ' Noble boy, you are an honor to your country?
Page 206 - ... both fore and aft. A bunch of folds was gathered up just below the waist behind, and a great bow rode a-top. A small jacket of the same material was adorned with a high ruff at the back, and laid well open over the breast, to display some lace and a locket. Heavy fringes, bows, puffs, ruffles and revers finished off the dress, making one's head ache to think of the amount of work wasted, for not a single graceful line struck the eye, and the beauty of the material was quite lost in the profusion...
Page 209 - Don't be absurd, Alec. There is no torture about it, for tight lacing is out of fashion, and we have nice, sensible things nowadays. Every one wears them ; even babies have stiffened waists to support their weak little backs," began Mrs. Clara, rushing to the defense of the pet delusion of most women. " I know it, and so the poor little souls have weak backs all their days, as their mothers had before them. It is vain to argue the matter, and I wont. try, but I wish to state, once for all, that if...
Page 221 - Ah, Mac, that's just what I keep lecturing about, and people won't listen. You lads need that sort of knowledge so much, and fathers and mothers ought to be able to give it to you. Few of them are able, and so we all go blundering, as you say. Less Greek and Latin and more knowledge of the laws of health for my boys, if I had them. Mathematics are all very well, but morals are better, and I wish, how I wish that I could help teachers and parents to feel it as they ought.
Page 95 - I feel just lil;. naving a good time ; don't you ? " said Rose, waving her arms as if she was going to fly. " I often feel that way, but I have to wait for my good times, and don't stop working to wish for 'em. There, now you can finish as soon as the dust settles ; I must go do my stairs," and Phebe trudged away with the broom, singing as she went. Rose leaned where she was, and fell to thinking how many good times she had had lately, for the gardening had prospered finely, and she was learning...
Page 197 - But my sons are neither boot-blacks nor newsboys, and I object to hearing them use such words as 'screamer,' 'bully,' and 'buster.' In fact, I fail to see the advantage of writing books about such people unless it is done in a very different way. I cannot think they will help to refine the ragamuffins, if they read them, and I'm sure they can do no good to the better class of boys, who through these books are introduced to police courts, counterfeiters' dens, gambling houses, drinking saloons, and...
Page 203 - ... answered Dr. Alec, looking at her with approving eyes. • " I 'm so glad you think I can do anything, for I perfectly ache to be useful, every one is so good to me, especially Aunt Jessie." '' I think you are in a fair way to pay your debts, Rosy, for when girls give up their little vanities, and boys their small vices, and try to strengthen each other in well-doing, matters are going as they ought. Work away, my dear, and help their mother keep these sons fit friends for an innocent creature...
Page 75 - Very well ; now steer toward the wharf where the big ship with the queer flag is. That 's the ' Rajah,' and we will go aboard if we can." In among the ships they went, by the wharves where the water was green and still, and queer barnacles grew on the slippery piles. Odd smells saluted her nose, and odd sights met her eyes, but Rose liked it all and played she was really landing...

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