Eight Cousins

Front Cover
1st World Publishing, Dec 1, 2004 - Juvenile Fiction - 300 pages
4 Reviews
Purchase one of 1st World Library's Classic Books and help support our free internet library of downloadable eBooks. Visit us online at www.1stWorldLibrary.ORG - - Rose sat all alone in the big best parlor, with her little handkerchief laid ready to catch the first tear, for she was thinking of her troubles, and a shower was expected. She had retired to this room as a good place in which to be miserable; for it was dark and still, full of ancient furniture, sombre curtains, and hung all around with portraits of solemn old gentlemen in wigs, severe-nosed ladies in top-heavy caps, and staring children in little bob-tailed coats or short-waisted frocks. It was an excellent place for woe; and the fitful spring rain that pattered on the window-pane seemed to sob, "Cry away: I'm with you." Rose really did have some cause to be sad; for she had no mother, and had lately lost her father also, which left her no home but this with her great-aunts. She had been with them only a week, and, though the dear old ladies had tried their best to make her happy, they had not succeeded very well, for she was unlike any child they had ever seen, and they felt very much as if they had the care of a low-spirited butterfly.
 

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Review: Eight Cousins

User Review  - Rose - Christianbook.com

One of my all-time favourites; I would recommend this book to anybody!!!! It's so sweet and wholesome; I love the language too. The sequel, "Rose in Bloom", is even better and by far my favourite classic I've ever read. Read full review

Review: Eight Cousins

User Review  - Jenny - Christianbook.com

I absolutly love this book!!! And even though I am in college it is still one of my all time favorites. In fact I am rereading it right now. You should get it!!! Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Two Girls
7
The Clan
17
Uncles
30
Aunts
45
A Belt and a Box
55
Uncle Alecs Room
67
A Trip to China
79
And what came of it
91
A Happy Birthday
157
EarRings
173
Bread and ButtonHoles
187
Good Bargains
199
Fashion and Physiology
213
Brother Bones
226
Under The Mistletoe
236
A Scare
250

Phebes Secret
101
Roses Sacrifice
117
Poor Mac
127
The Other Fellows
138
Cosey Corner
149
Something to do
262
PeaceMaking
274
Which?
288
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About the author (2004)

Louisa May Alcott was born in Germantown, Pennsylvania, in 1832. Two years later, she moved with her family to Boston and in 1840 to Concord, which was to remain her family home for the rest of her life. Her father, Bronson Alcott, was a transcendentalist and friend of Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau. Alcott early realized that her father could not be counted on as sole support of his family, and so she sacrificed much of her own pleasure to earn money by sewing, teaching, and churning out potboilers. Her reputation was established with Hospital Sketches (1863), which was an account of her work as a volunteer nurse in Washington, D.C. Alcott's first works were written for children, including her best-known Little Women (1868--69) and Little Men: Life at Plumfield with Jo's Boys (1871). Moods (1864), a "passionate conflict," was written for adults. Alcott's writing eventually became the family's main source of income. Throughout her life, Alcott continued to produce highly popular and idealistic literature for children. An Old-Fashioned Girl (1870), Eight Cousins (1875), Rose in Bloom (1876), Under the Lilacs (1878), and Jack and Jill (1881) enjoyed wide popularity. At the same time, her adult fiction, such as the autobiographical novel Work: A Story of Experience (1873) and A Modern Mephistopheles (1877), a story based on the Faust legend, shows her deeper concern with such social issues as education, prison reform, and women's suffrage. She realistically depicts the problems of adolescents and working women, the difficulties of relationships between men and women, and the values of the single woman's life.

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