Eight Months on Ghazzah Street: A Novel

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Macmillan, Sep 1, 2003 - Fiction - 288 pages
3 Reviews

When Frances Shore moves to Saudi Arabia, she settles in a nondescript sublet, sure that common sense and an open mind will serve her well with her Muslim neighbors. But in the dim, airless flat, Frances spends lonely days writing in her diary, hearing the sounds of sobs through the pipes from the floor above, and seeing the flitting shadows of men on the stairwell. It's all in her imagination, she's told by her neighbors; the upstairs flat is empty, no one uses the roof. But Frances knows otherwise, and day by day, her sense of foreboding grows even as her sense of herself begins to disintegrate.

 

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EIGHT MONTHS ON GHAZZAH STREET

User Review  - Jane Doe - Kirkus

A chilling portrait of an authoritarian society as a young Englishwoman moves with her husband into a Saudi Arabian neighborhood and finds murder lurking behind the shuttered windows and closed doors ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - brendanmoody - LibraryThing

Masterfully blending gothic horror tropes with a careful study of the intellectual dislocation and resulting eccentric behavior of Westerners working in Saudi Arabia, Hilary Mantel's Eight Months on ... Read full review

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Contents

September 1984
5
Muharram
22
Safar
68
Rabi alawal
108
Rabi althani
155
Part 2
175
Jamadi alawal
177
Jamadi althani
197
Rajab
217
Shaban
276
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About the author (2003)

Hilary Mantel is the bestselling author of many novels including Wolf Hall, which won the Man Booker Prize and the National Book Critics Circle Award for fiction. Bring Up the Bodies, Book Two of the Thomas Cromwell Trilogy, was also awarded the Man Booker Prize and the Costa Book Award. She is also the author of A Change of Climate, A Place of Greater Safety, Eight Months on Ghazzah Street, An Experiment in Love, The Giant, O'Brien, Fludd, Beyond Black, Every Day Is Mother's Day, and Vacant Possession. She has also written a memoir, Giving Up the Ghost. Mantel was the winner of the Hawthornden Prize, and her reviews and essays have appeared in The New York Times, The New York Review of Books, and the London Review of Books. She lives in England with her husband.

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