El contrato social

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EDAF, 1983 - Law - 224 pages
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Contents

Prólogo por Mauro Armiño
11
Bibliografía
33
LIBRO PRIMERO
45
De la esclavitud
51
Del pacto social
59
Del estado civil
65
LIBRO SEGUNDO
71
De si la voluntad general puede errar
75
VIL De los gobiernos mixtos
138
No toda forma de gobierno es propia de cualquier país
140
De los signos de un buen gobierno
147
Del abuso del gobierno y de su inclina ción a degenerar
149
De la muerte del cuerpo político
153
Cómo se mantiene la autoridad soberana
155
Continuación
156
Continuación
159

De los límites del poder soberano
77
Del derecho de vida y muerte
82
De la ley
85
VIL Del legislador
89
Del pueblo
95
Continuación
98
Continuación
101
De los diversos sistemas de legislación
105
División de las leyes
108
LIBRO TERCERO I Del gobierno en general
111
Del principio que constituye las diversas formas de gobierno
118
ni División de los gobiernos
122
De la democracia
124
De la aristocracia
127
De la monarquía
130
De los diputados o representantes
160
La institución del gobierno no es un con trato
165
De la institución de gobierno
167
Medios de prevenir la usurpación del go bierno
168
LIBRO CUARTO I La voluntad general es indestructible
173
H Del sufragio
176
IU De las elecciones
180
De los comicios romanos
183
Del tribunado
197
De la dictadura
200
VQ De la censura
204
De la religión civil
207
Conclusión
222
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About the author (1983)

Jean Jacques Rousseau was a Swiss philosopher and political theorist who lived much of his life in France. Many reference books describe him as French, but he generally added "Citizen of Geneva" whenever he signed his name. He presented his theory of education in Emile (1762), a novel, the first book to link the educational process to a scientific understanding of children; Rousseau is thus regarded as the precursor, if not the founder, of child psychology. "The greatest good is not authority, but liberty," he wrote, and in The Social Contract (1762) Rousseau moved from a study of the individual to an analysis of the relationship of the individual to the state: "The art of politics consists of making each citizen extremely dependent upon the polis in order to free him from dependence upon other citizens." This doctrine of sovereignty, the absolute supremacy of the state over its members, has led many to accuse Rousseau of opening the doors to despotism, collectivism, and totalitarianism. Others say that this is the opposite of Rousseau's intent, that the surrender of rights is only apparent, and that in the end individuals retain the rights that they appear to have given up. In effect, these Rousseau supporters say, the social contract is designed to secure or to restore to individuals in the state of civilization the equivalent of the rights they enjoyed in the state of nature. Rousseau was a passionate man who lived in passionate times, and he still stirs passion in those who write about him today.

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