El purgatorio de San Patricio

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Liverpool University Press, 1988 - History - 213 pages
This is a critical edition of this play by Calderon, based primarily on the text of the "primera parte" of 1635, but also taking into account three other 17th-century printed editions and a scribal manuscript in the Biblioteca Nacional of Madrid. The relationship between these texts is discussed in the introduction, which also deals with the source of the legend of Saint Patrick's purgatory. The introduction also considers the literary sources of the play, notably "Vida y Purgatorio de San Patricio", the date of composition, versification, and the ways in which the the play has been staged.

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Contents

Abbreviations
11
HI NOTES
167
Bibliography
207
Copyright

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About the author (1988)

Pedro Calderón de la Barca was born in Madrid, Spain on January 17, 1600. He was educated at the Jesuit College in Madrid. He was a dramatist, poet and writer of the Spanish Golden Age. He wrote more than 120 plays and over 70 allegorical religious plays with subjects from mythology and the Old and the New Testaments. Calderón's debut as a playwright was Amor, Honor y Poder, performed at the Royal Palace. His other plays include La Selva Confusa, Los Macabeos, El Magico Prodigioso, El Alcalde de Zalamea, La Vida Es Sueno, and La Estatua de Prometeo. Calderón gained popularity in the court, and was made a knight of the order of Santiago by Philip IV, who had already commissioned from him a series of plays for the royal theatre in the Buen Retiro palace. Calderón became a tertiary of the order of St Francis in 1650, and then finally joined the priesthood. He was ordained in 1651, and became a priest at San Salvador at Madrid. He was appointed honorary chaplain to Philip IV in 1663, and continued as chaplain to his successor. In his eighty-first year he wrote his last secular play, Hado y Divisa de Leonido y Marfisa, in honor of Charles II's marriage to Maria Luisa of Orléans. He died on May 25, 1681.