Elements of Natural Philosophy, Part 1

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Page 161 - that every particle of matter in the universe attracts every other particle, with a force whose direction is that of the line joining the two, and whose magnitude is directly as the product of their masses, and inversely as the square of their distances from each other.
Page 9 - Persius. The Satires. With a Translation and Commentary. By John Conington, MA, late Corpus Professor of Latin in the University of Oxford. Edited by H. Nettleship, MA Second Edition.
Page 65 - Every body continues in its state of rest or of uniform motion in a straight line, except in so far as it is compelled by force to change that state.
Page 10 - Crown 8vo. cloth, 7s. 6d. A Treatise on Electricity and Magnetism. By J. Clerk Maxwell, MA, FRS, Professor of Experimental Physics in the University of Cambridge.
Page 28 - Fourier's theorem is not only one of the most beautiful results of modern analysis, but may be said to furnish an indispensable instrument in the treatment of nearly every recondite question in modern physics.
Page 161 - Newton generalized the law of attraction into a statement that every particle of matter in the universe attracts every other particle with a force which varies directly as the product of their masses and inversely as the square of the distance between them; and he thence deduced the law of attraction for spherical shells of constant density.
Page 66 - Change of motion is proportional to the impressed force and takes place in the direction of the straight line in which the force acts.
Page 68 - To every action there is always an equal and contrary reaction; or, the mutual actions of any two bodies are always equal and oppositely directed in the same straight line.
Page 9 - An Elementary Treatise on Quaternions. By PG TAIT, MA, Professor of Natural Philosophy in the University of Edinburgh ; formerly Fellow of St Peter's College, Cambridge. Second Edition. Demy 8vo. 14*.
Page 130 - UNTIL we know thoroughly the nature of matter and the forces which produce its motions, it will be utterly impossible to submit to mathematical reasoning the exact conditions of any physical question.

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