Elements of General History, Ancient and Modern

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H. Hill & Company, 1890 - History - 571 pages
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Contents

Establishment of the Greek Colonies
25
The Republic of Sparta
26
The Republic of Athens
28
Of the state of the Persian Empire and its History down to the War with Greece
29
sect
32
The War between Greece and Persia Sect 13 Age of Pericles
33
The Republic of Thebes sect 15 Philip of Macedon
35
Alexander the Great
36
Successors of Alexander
38
Fall and conquest of Greece
39
Political Reflections arising from the History of the States of Greece
40
State of the Arts in Greece
41
Of the Greek Poets
43
Sect
44
Of the Greek Historians
45
Of the Greek Philosophers
47
The History of Rome
49
Sect
50
Reflections on the Government and State of Rome under the Kings
52
Rome under the Consuls
53
The Law of Volero
56
The Decemvirate
57
Increase of popular Power
58
Conquest of Italy by the Romans
59
History of Carthage
60
History of Sicily
61
The Punic Wars
62
The Gracchi and the Corruption of the Commonwealth
64
A 2
65
Considerations on such particulars as mark the Genius and national Character of the Romans
70
Of the Progress of Literature among the Romans
71
State of Philosophy among the Romans
75
Of the Public and Private Manners of the Romans
76
Of the Art of War among the Romans
77
Reflections arising from a View of the Roman History during the Commonwealth
79
Rome under the Emperors St Sect 42 The same subject continued S4 Sect 43 Age of the Antonines c
87
State of the Roman Empire at the time of Constantine His Successors
90
Progress of the Christian Religion from its Institution to the Extinction of Paganism in tho Reign of Theodosius
93
Extinction of the Roman Empire in the West
95
F║rmpire of the West under the Successors of Charlemagne
116
Empire of the East during the Eighth and Ninth Centuries
118
State of the Church in the Eighth and Ninth Centuries
119
Of the Saracens in the Eighth and Ninth Centuries
120
Empire of the West and Italy in the Tenth and Eleventh enturies
121
History of Britain from its earliest Period down to the Nor man Conquest
123
Of the Government Laws and Manners of the AngloSaxons
127
Of the Reformation in England under Henry VIII and
174
and Religion of the Hindoos
186
Mr Baillys Theory of the Origin of the Sciences among
192
Sect 54 State of France in the End of the Sixteenth Century under
197
History of Great Britain in the Reigns of James I
203
A General View of the History of Mankind in the Primeval
231
Of the Antediluvian World
240
Regal Government of the Hebrews
246
The State of Learning and Commerce among the Jews
252
England from the Accession of the House of Hanover
262
Austria and Germany from the Peace of Rastadt 1714
268
State of Europe at the Conclusion of the Peace of Aixla
278
From the Accession of George III 1760 to the Commence
288
France from the Peace of Paris 1763 to the Opening of the
297
Austria from the conclusion of the Seven Years War to
307
S ct 12 France from the Opening of the Assembly of the States
316
Great Britain from the conclusion of the American War
322
France from the death of the King and Queen and Over
337
F║ from the Peace of Amiens to the Treaty of Tilsit 1S
353
Poland from the Commencement of the Eighteenth Century
363
Great Britain from the Peace of Amiens 1802 to the death
369
France from the Entrance of the Allies into Paris March
375
s║ States of Europe from the Close of the Seventeenth Sentury
391
State of Arts Sciences Religion Laws Government c 303
398
Electricity
405
Discoveries and Inventions
419
Discovery of America 494
424
Settlement of Massachusetts RhodeIsland Connecticut New
431
War with France and Conquest of Canada Disputes with
438
Establishment of the State and National Governments Wars
448
A Table of Chronology
460
Companative view of Ascient And Modzan Geography
499

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Page 191 - ... excellence of the material. 9. The morals of the Chinese have furnished much subject both of encomium and censure. The books of Confucius are said to contain a most admirable system of morality ; but the principles of morals have their foundation in human nature, and must, in theory, be every where the same. The moral virtues of a people are not to be estimated from the books of their philosophers. It is probable that the manners of the superior classes are in China, as elsewhere, much influenced...
Page 180 - At the end of the fifteenth and the beginning of the sixteenth century, society was in a state of excitement.
Page 194 - In his time, the balance of power in Europe, was sustained by Spain, France, England and Germany, all, at this time, highly flourishing and respectable, either from the talents of their sovereigns, or their internal strength. Philip was an acute and able politician, though his policy partook somewhat of selfish cunning. He was sovereign of Spain, the two Sicilies, Milan, and the Netherlands. He had likewise, for a few years, the resources of England at command, by his marriage with Mary, the 'English...
Page 42 - Doric has a masculine grandeur, and a superior air of strength to both the others. It is therefore best adapted to works of great magnitude, and of a sublime character. The character of sublimity is essentially connected with chaste-ness and simplicity. Of this order is the temple of Theseus at Athens, built ten years after the battle of Marathon, and at this day almost entire. The Ionic order is light and elegant. The former has a masculine grandeur ; the latter a feminine elegance.
Page 447 - Weathersfield, in Connecticut, left Arnold to command the important post of West Point, which guards a pass in Hudson's river, about sixty miles from New York. Arnold's conduct in the city of Philadelphia, the preceding winter, had been censured; and the treatment he received in consequence, had given him offence. He determined to take revenge; and for this purpose he entered into a negotiation with Sir Henry Clinton to deliver West Point, and the army, into the hands of the British.
Page 168 - ... dominions were the subject of perpetual hostility. The emperor claimed Artois as part of the Netherlands. Francis prepared to make good his right to the two Sicilies. Charles had to defend Milan, and support his title to Navarre, which had been wrested from France by his grandfather Ferdinand. Henry VIII. of England was courted by the rival monarchs, as the weight of England was sufficient to turn the scale, where the power of each was nearly balanced.
Page 205 - Episcopal hierarchy was solemnly abolished (1638). To maintain this violent procedure, the Scots reformers took up arms ; and, after seizing and fortifying the most important places of strength in the kingdom, boldly marched into the heart of England. 12. It was now absolutely necessary to assemble a parliament; and the king at length saw that the torrent was irresistible, and resolved, though too late, to give it way.
Page 156 - Industry, good order, and perfect subordination, were the fruit of the excellent laws passed in this reign ; though the temper of the sovereign was despotic, and his avarice, in the latter part of his reign, prompted to the most oppressive exactions. 11. The government of Henry was disturbed by two very singular enterprises ; the attempt of Lambert Simnel, the son of a baker, to counterfeit the person of the earl of Warwick, son of the duke of Clarence ; and the similar attempt of Perkin Warbeck,...
Page 444 - The operations of the British began by the action on Long Island, in the month of August. The Americans were defeated, and general Sullivan and Lord Sterling, with a large body of men, were made prisoners. The night after the engagement, a retreat was ordered, and executed with such silence, that the Americans left the Island without alarming their enemies, and without loss. In September, the city of New- York was abandoned by the American army, and taken by the British.
Page 448 - General Washington had before this time moved the main body of his army, together with the French troops, to the southward ; and, as soon as he heard of the arrival of the French fleet in the Chesapeake, he made rapid marches to the head of the Elk, where, embarking, the troops soon arrived at Yorktown.

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