Elements of mechanism: elucidating the scientific principles of the practical construction of machines. For the use of students in mechanical engineering. With numerous specimens of modern machines

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J. Weale, 1852 - History - 225 pages
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Page 228 - VALUING ARTIFICERS' WORKS; containing Directions for taking Dimensions, Abstracting the same, and bringing the Quantities into Bill, with Tables of Constants, and copious Memoranda for the Valuation of Labour and Materials in the respective Trades of Bricklayer and Slater, Carpenter and Joiner, Painter and Glazier, Paperhanger, &c.
Page 170 - A. By using the centre die every description of flat or circular work can be riveted, and by selecting those on the sides it -will rivet the corners, and thus complete vessels of almost every description. This machine is of a portable form, and can be moved on rails to suit the article suspended from the hook. This machine fixes in the firmest manner, and completes 8 rivets of f-inch diameter in a minute, with the attendance of two men and two boys ; whereas the average work that can be done by two...
Page 174 - ... that it may be put in communication with the boiler at pleasure. When the stop-cock is open, the steam acting on the mercury in one leg of the gauge presses it down, and the mercury in the other leg rises. The difference between the two columns is the height of mercury which corresponds to the excess of the pressure of the steam in the boiler above the pressure of the atmosphere ; or, in other words, to the effective pressure on the safetyvalve.
Page 117 - ... and the friction of the wheel on its axis ; and, where a large quantity of water is to be raised to a moderate height, both of these resistances may be rendered inconsiderable.
Page 32 - The opposite figure represents the Odontograph exactly half the size of the original ; but as it is merely formed out of a sheet of card-paper, this figure will enable any one to make it for use. The side NTM, which corresponds to the line...
Page 140 - Boyden's wheel). (3). That they will work at very different velocities above or below that corresponding to the maximum effect, without the useful effect varying materially from that maximum. (4). That they will work from one to two yards deep under water, without the proportion which the useful effect bears to the total force being sensibly diminished. (5). In consequence of the...
Page 35 - ... the numbers in the two following series are so arranged that the curves corresponding to them possess this required property. For the outer side of the tooth, 12, 14, 17, 21, 26, 34, 47, 73, 148, Rack. For the inner side, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 19, 22, 26, 33, 46, 87, Rack. Now these numbers, although strictly correct, would be very inconvenient and uncouth in practice if employed for a table like that in question, where convenience manifestly requires that the numbers, if not consecutive, should...
Page 26 - BEVEL-WHEELS. 43. The axes of wheels, whether they be parallel or inclined to one another, may be made to revolve either in the same or opposite directions, according to the relative positions of the wheels. Thus, in the marginal fig., the intermediate bevel-wheels B and E, mounted on the same axis, connect the driving-wheel A with the wheels c and D ; of which the wheel c revolves in the same direction as A ; and the wheel D in the contrary direction. MABLBOROUGH WHEELS. 44. When the shafts of two...
Page 34 - It is unnecessary to have numbers corresponding to every wheel, for the error produced by taking those which belong to the nearest as directed, is so small as to be unappreciable in practice. I have calculated the amount and nature of these errors by way of obtaining a principle for the number and arrangement of the wheels selected. It is unnecessary to go at length into these calculations, which result from very simple considerations, but I will briefly state the results. The difference of form...
Page 132 - Tt will be seen the leverage of those buckets at the extreme right of the wheel is the greatest, and those towards the top of the wheel, receiving the impulse of the water, have also considerable leverage, while those towards the bottom of the wheel, becoming gradually empty, have the least leverage. THE BBEAST WHEEL. and somewhat assimilated to buckets. The water meets the wheel at about half, and sometimes at about a third of its height, the water being considerably confined in the buckets by means...

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