Elements of Mechanism: Elucidating the Scientific Principles of the Practical Construction of Machines. For the Use of Students in Mechanical Engineering. With Numerous Specimens of Modern Machines

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J. Weale, 1852 - Machinery, Kinematics of - 225 pages
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Page 228 - MEASURING and VALUING ARTIFICERS' WORKS; containing Directions for taking Dimensions, Abstracting the same, and bringing the Quantities into Bill, with Tables of Constants, and copious Memoranda for the Valuation of Labour and Materials in the respective Trades of Bricklayer and Slater, Carpenter and Joiner, Painter and Glazier, Paperhanger, &c.
Page 80 - J will turn the verge in the same direction, until, by the circular motion of A, its extremity is lifted so high that the crown-wheel tooth passes under it, or, in other words, this tooth escapes from the pallet. By the same motion of the verge the pallet...
Page 115 - MN from its greatest elevation, the increased elasticity of the air in the body of the pump will keep the valve at c closed and open that at H, whence air will escape. By similar ascents and descents of the piston the air will be expelled and water rise into the body of the pump. The descending piston will then press the water through the valve at H, which will close and prevent its return into the body of the pump. The ascents and descents of the piston, being thus continued, will raise the water...
Page 171 - By using the centre die every description of flat or circular work can be riveted, and by selecting those on the sides it -will rivet the corners, and thus complete vessels of almost every description. This machine is of a portable form, and can be moved on rails to suit the article suspended from the hook. This machine fixes in the firmest manner, and completes 8 rivets of f-inch diameter in a minute, with the attendance of two men and two boys ; whereas the average work that can be done by two...
Page 64 - Thence the line follows south of the Benue, the circumference of a circle, the centre of which is the centre of the town of Yola as it existed in 1893, and the radius of which is the distance between the centre of the town of Yola and the point on the left bank of the Benue...
Page 174 - ... that it may be put in communication with the boiler at pleasure. When the stop-cock is open, the steam acting on the mercury in one leg of the gauge presses it down, and the mercury in the other leg rises. The difference between the two columns is the height of mercury which corresponds to the excess of the pressure of the steam in the boiler above the pressure of the atmosphere ; or, in other words, to the effective pressure on the safetyvalve.
Page 117 - ... and the friction of the wheel on its axis ; and, where a large quantity of water is to be raised to a moderate height, both of these resistances may be rendered inconsiderable.
Page 176 - ... the spring with a force equal to the excess* of the pressure of the steam above that of the atmosphere. When, on the other hand, a vacuum is produced in the cylinder by the condensation of the steam, the same vacuum will be produced under the piston in the indicator, and the...
Page 34 - ... inch pitch, by always taking the nearest number in the manner directed; and a proportionably smaller error in smaller pitches. But to ensure this, the selected numbers should be so taken, that their respective forms shall lie between the extremes at equal distances. Now it appears that the variation of form is much greater among the teeth of small numbers than among the larger ones, and that in fact the numbers in the two following series are so arranged, that * Willis's Principles of Mechanism,...
Page 140 - Boyden's wheel). (3). That they will work at very different velocities above or below that corresponding to the maximum effect, without the useful effect varying materially from that maximum. (4). That they will work from one to two yards deep under water, without the proportion which the useful effect bears to the total force being sensibly diminished. (5). In consequence of the...

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