Eleventh Annual Address of the President, to the Philological Society: Delivered at the Anniversary Meeting, Friday, 19th May, 1882

Front Cover
publisher not identified - Philology - 148 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 39 - In taking two stations having the same value, the one to the north and the other to the south of...
Page 92 - Accadian writers. It was as yet impossible to separate classical from monkish Accadian ; to determine whether the Semitic text were a translation of an older Accadian one, or whether the Accadian was a literary rendering of a Semitic original. Even now, with all the progress that has been made during the last few years in our knowledge of the pre-Semitic dialects of Chaldsea, it is not always easy to decide the question.
Page 51 - ... in adding their affixes they follow the principles of the ordinary agglutinative tongues ; in adding their prefixes they follow the well-defined principles of the South African tongues. Hitherto, as far as I know, the two principles in full play have never been found together in any other language... In Andamanese both are...
Page 51 - In adding their affixes they follow the principles of the ordinary agglutinative tongues ; in adding their prefixes they follow the well-defined principles of the South African tongues. Hitherto, as far as I know, the two principles in full play have never been found together in any other language. Languages which are found to follow the one have the other in only a rudimentary form present in them.
Page 52 - Andaman group, and even in each member of the group, but these are only such as are incidental to the grammar of other languages, and do not affect its general tenor. I consider, therefore, that the...
Page 107 - school, of which Prof. Max Miiller, with his fascinating and facile pen, is both the founder and still the worthiest representative. Perhaps, indeed, some of those whose mental digestions have not been hopelessly impaired by the toffy and Turkish delight served up to them in the pages of Prof. Miiller and his numerous followers, will turn with something like a sigh of relief to the plain loaf of whole-meal bread provided by Prof. Paul, tough as its crust undoubtedly is.
Page 60 - ... with precisely what I wanted. When he was sent officially to the Nicobar Islands, he took with him several young native Andamanese,1 and in order to keep up their connection with their friends, and especially with their head-man, .jambu (as he was always called, though that was not his real name), Mr. Man wrote letters for them at their dictation. He had to treat them quite like children for whom one writes letters, suggesting subjects, asking what they would say if they saw .jam-bu, and so on.
Page 52 - ... another way, of long compounds which are sentences in themselves, but the construction of these words is not synthetic but agglutinative, and they are as words either compound nouns or verbs taking their place in the sentence, and having the same relation to the other words in it as they would were they to be introduced into a sentence in any other agglutinative language. There are of course many peculiarities of grammar in the Andamanese group, and even in each member of the group, but these...

Bibliographic information