Elizabethan Critical Essays, Volume 1

Front Cover
George Gregory Smith
Clarendon Press, 1904 - Criticism
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 204 - I know some will say it is a mingled language. And why not so much the better, taking the best of both the other?
Page 357 - He that will write well in any tongue, must follow this counsel of Aristotle, to speak as the common people do, to think as wise men do : and so should every man understand him, and the judgment of wise men allow him.
Page 172 - ... with a tale, forsooth ; he cometh unto you, with a tale, which holdeth children from play and old men from the chimney-corner...
Page 157 - ... bringeth things forth far surpassing her doings, with no small argument to the incredulous of that first accursed fall of Adam: sith our erected wit, maketh us know what perfection is, and yet our infected will, keepeth us from reaching unto it.
Page 179 - For as the image of each action stirreth and instructeth the mind, so the lofty image of such worthies most inflameth the mind with desire to be worthy, and informs with counsel how to be worthy.
Page 312 - The sea exhaled by droppes will in continuance be drie, and Seneca let bloud line by line, and page by page, at length must needes die to our stage...
Page 178 - ... valour, which that right soldier-like nation think the chiefest kindlers of brave courage. The incomparable Lacedaemonians did not only carry that kind of music ever with them to the field, but even at home, as such songs were made, so were they all content to be...
Page 158 - Poesy, therefore, is an art of imitation, for so Aristotle termeth it in his word Mimesis, that is to say, a representing, counterfeiting, or figuring forth: to speak metaphorically, a speaking picture : with this end, to teach and delight; of this have been three several kinds.
Page 155 - There is no art delivered unto mankind that hath not the works of nature for his principal object, without which they could not consist, and on which they so depend as they become actors and players, as it were, of what nature will have set forth.
Page xxvi - ... cometh to you with words set in delightful proportion, either accompanied with, or prepared for, the well enchanting skill of music; and with a tale forsooth he cometh unto you, with a tale which holdeth children from play, and old men from the chimney corner.

Bibliographic information