Elmer

Front Cover
Harper Collins, Sep 18, 1989 - Juvenile Fiction - 32 pages
15 Reviews

Elmer the elephant is bright-colored patchwork all over. No wonder the other elephants laugh at him! If he were ordinary elephant color, the others might stop laughing. That would make Elmer feel better, wouldn't it? The surprising conclusion of David McKee's comical fable is a celebration of individuality and the power of laughter.

Elmer the elephant, a colorful character because of his patchwork hide and sense of humor, tries to blend in with the herd, but soon realizes that he's happiest just being himself. "McKee's gentle humor and love of irony are in full force in this celebration of individuality and laughter." -- Publisher's Weekly.

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
9
4 stars
4
3 stars
2
2 stars
0
1 star
0

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - eilawest - LibraryThing

Elmer the elephant is a bright, multicolored, patchwork patterned elephant living among plain gray colored elephants. The other elephants pick on him and laugh at him, so Elmer tries to find ways to ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - cseiger - LibraryThing

Elmer is an adorable book to teach young children about how being different is ok. It focuses on Elmer, a patchwork colored elephant surrounded by normal colored elephants. He feels that the other ... Read full review

Other editions - View all

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1989)

David McKee grew up in Devon, England. Later, while a student at Plymouth Art College, he began selling his cartoon drawings to newspapers. Since 1964 he has published a number of successful books for children, including the King Rollo stories, which he helped animate for British television. His first book for Lothrop was Snow Woman, of which Publishers Weekly said, "It is McKee's superb humor--conveyed almost solely in the illustrations...that wins the day." Of his second Lothrop book, Who's a Clever Baby, Publishers Weekly had this to say: "Grandma's alliterative frenzies are fascinating and readers will find Baby's manipulative stubbornness vastly amusing."

Mr. McKee enjoys traveling and doing books that "leave things unsaid."

Bibliographic information