Elster's Folly

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T.B. Peterson, 1866 - English fiction - 275 pages
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Page 275 - Rejoice, O young man, in thy youth; and let thy heart cheer thee in the days of thy youth, and walk in the ways of thine heart, and in the sight of thine eyes: but know thou, that for all these things God will bring thee into judgment.
Page 192 - We spake of many a vanished scene, Of what we once had thought and said, Of what had been and might have been, And who was changed and who was dead...
Page 233 - Eighteen months ! for such a wife as Maude was to you !" violently danced the dowager. " You ought to have mourned her eighteen years : anybody else would. I wish I had never let you have her." The earl wished it likewise ; with all his heart and soul, had wished it in his lady's lifetime. " I might have known better than to suffer you to cajole me out of her: I " " Stay, madam," interrupted Lord Hartledon ; " if you will cast your thoughts back, you may remember that instead of your being cajoled...
Page 117 - And of the formidable countess dowager. You must tell Maude the truth." "Impossible, Carr. I might have done it once, but the thing has gone on so long. The dowager would eat me up." " Let her try at it. I should speak to Lady Maude alone, and put her upon her generosity to release you. Tell her you presumed upon your cousinship ; and confess that you have long been engaged to marry Miss Ashton." " She knows that : they have both known it all along. My brother was the first to tell them, before he...
Page 253 - The countess dowager had been arming herself against infection : she had disposed of a pound of camphor amongst her gauzes, and she held a handkerchief, saturated with spirits of camphor, before her nose and mouth. " Well, Pepps," cried she, dodging from him as he advanced, so as to keep a safe distance between them, " what is it ?" " I do not take upon myself to pronounce an opinion, Lady Kirton...
Page 261 - ... can't think why they are allowed here, to disturb Edward and Maude." Lady Hartledon bore the words without retorting : she had frequently worse than those to bear. But Lady Laura, impulsive and generous by nature, advanced to the middle of the room, and looked indignation at her brother. " Percival, I am ashamed of you : Margaret, I am ashamed of you: I am ashamed of you all. You are doing the children a lasting injury, and you are guilty of cruel insult to Lady Hartledon. This is the second...
Page 237 - Anne," he said, in a voice that trembled, in spite of its displeased tones, " allow me to beg your pardon : and I do it with heartfelt shame that this gratuitous insult should have been offered you in my — in your house. A day or two, my love, will serve to put matters on their right footing : the children have been tutored.
Page 236 - What did I hear you say about ' bad people,' Edward ?" " She," answered the boy, pointing a slice of the dripping pine-apple towards Lady Hartledou. " She shan't touch Maude. She's come here to beat us and to hate us, and I'll kick her if she touches me." The earl choked down his passion. An unmistakable look at the countess dowager, and then he rose from his seat in silence. Carrying the little girl in one arm, he...
Page 189 - Bless the tongue that tells me that. Oh, how much wiser you are than the rest of us ! Mr. Coventry, pity and forgive a poor girl who has used you ill. Tell me — tell me — what can have become of him ? " Coventry was much agitated, and could not speak for some time, and when he did, it was in a faint voice as of one exhausted by a mental struggle. "Would you rather he was — dead — or false ? " " Oh, false — a thousand times. Prove to me he is not dead, but only false to his poor Grace, and...
Page 233 - Dropped ; yes ! To give place to this new creature ; your old flame, your parson's daughter. A reputable young woman she must be, to force herself indecently into Maude's shoes : I always thought her one." The earl had imperiously raised his hand for silence: but who could stop the dowager countess when she chose to continue ? His face was working with anger. " Be silent, madam, will you ? Let us understand each other. Your visit here is ill-timed ; you ought to feel it so ; nevertheless, if you...

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