Embedded System Design

Front Cover
Springer Science & Business Media, 2003 - Technology & Engineering - 241 pages
Embedded systems can be defined as information processing systems embedded into enclosing products such as cars, telecommunication or fabrication equipment. Such systems come with a large number of common characteristics, including real-time constraints, and dependability as well as efficiency requirements. Following the success of information technology (IT) for office and workflow applications, embedded systems are considered to be the most important application area of IT during the coming years. This importance of embedded systems is so far not well reflected in many of the current curricula. Embedded System Design is intended as an aid for changing this situation. It provides the material for a first course on embedded systems, but can also be used by PhD students and professors. A key goal of this book is to provide an overview of embedded system design and to relate the most important topics in embedded system design to each other. It should help to motivate students as well as professors to put more emphasis on education in embedded systems. In order to facilitate teaching from this book, slides, exercises and other related material can be downloaded via the author's web page.
 

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Contents

INTRODUCTION
1
12 Application areas
5
13 Growing importance of embedded systems
8
14 Structure of this book
9
SPECIFICATIONS
13
22 Models of computation
16
23 StateCharts
18
231 Modeling of hierarchy
19
36 Output
120
361 DAconverters
121
362 Actuators
122
EMBEDDED OPERATING SYSTEMS MIDDLEWARE AND SCHEDULING
125
41 Prediction of execution times
126
42 Scheduling in realtime systems
127
421 Classification of scheduling algorithms
128
422 Aperiodic scheduling
131

232 Timers
23
233 Edge labels and StateCharts semantics
24
234 Evaluation and extensions
26
24 General language characteristics
27
242 Process concepts
28
244 Specifying timing
29
245 Using nonstandard IO devices
30
26 Petri nets
36
262 Conditionevent nets
40
264 Predicatetransition nets
42
265 Evaluation
44
28 UML
45
29 Process networks
50
292 Asynchronous message passing
53
293 Synchronous message passing
55
210 Java
58
211 VHDL
59
2112 Entities and architectures
60
2113 Multivalued logic and IEEE 1164
62
2114 VHDL processes and simulation semantics
69
212 SystemC
73
213 Verilog and SystemVerilog
75
214 SpecC
76
215 Additional languages
77
216 Levels of hardware modeling
79
217 Language comparison
82
218 Dependability requirements
83
EMBEDDED SYSTEM HARDWARE
87
32 Input
88
322 Sampleandhold circuits
90
323 ADconverters
91
33 Communication
93
331 Requirements
94
332 Electrical robustness
95
333 Guaranteeing realtime behavior
96
334 Examples
97
34 Processing Units
98
342 ApplicationSpecific Circuits ASICs
100
344 Reconfigurable Logic
115
35 Memories
118
423 Periodic scheduling
135
424 Resource access protocols
140
43 Embedded operating systems
143
432 Realtime operating systems
144
44 Middleware
148
442 Access to remote objects
149
IMPLEMENTING EMBEDDED SYSTEMS HARDWARESOFTWARE CODESIGN
151
51 Task level concurrency management
153
52 Highlevel optimizations
157
522 Simple loop transformations
159
523 Loop tilingblocking
160
524 Loop splitting
163
525 Array folding
165
53 Hardwaresoftware partitioning
167
532 COOL
168
54 Compilers for embedded systems
177
542 Energyaware compilation
178
543 Compilation for digital signal processors
181
544 Compilation for multimedia processors
184
546 Compilation for network processors
185
55 Voltage Scaling and Power Management
186
552 Dynamic power management DPM
189
56 Actual design flows and tools
190
562 IMEC tool flow
191
563 The COSYMA design flow
194
564 Ptolemy II
195
565 The OCTOPUS design flow
196
VALIDATION
199
62 Simulation
200
63 Rapid Prototyping and Emulation
201
642 Design for testability
202
643 Selftest programs
205
65 Fault simulation
206
66 Fault injection
207
68 Formal Verification
209
Bibliography
212
About the Author
227
List of Figures
229
Index
237
Copyright

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About the author (2003)

Dr. Peter Marwedel received his PhD in Physics from the University of Kiel in 1974. He is one of the early researchers in high level synthesis, working on the MIMOLA system for a number of years. Dr. Marwedel is a professor at the University of Dortmund since 1989. He has served as the chairman of the computer science department, has played a leading role in establishing the Design, Automation and Test in Europe (DATE) conference and is the chairman of the Informatik Centrum Dortmund (ICD), a technology transfer centre.

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