Emergency Propaganda: The Winning of Malayan Hearts and Minds, 1948-1958

Front Cover
Psychology Press, 2002 - History - 306 pages
0 Reviews
Despite the existence of numerous analyses of the eventual British success in the Malayan Emergency, the contribution of propaganda to the defeat of the Malayan Communist Party (MCP) has never been exhaustively scrutinized. This book fills the gap in the literature and sheds new light on the hitherto neglected years of the Emergency - 1955 to 1958 - demonstrating how it was British propaganda which decisively ended the shooting war in December 1958. Essentially, the book argues for a concept of propaganda that embraces not merely words in the form of film, radio and leaflets but also deeds such as the behaviour of Government representatives and certain official policies. It argues that for propaganda to be effective, the message transmitted by the propagandists's words must be congruent with that suggested by his actual deeds.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

The Missing Dimension
1
The Malayan Communist Party and its Impact on Terrorist
26
The Mistakes of the Gurney Years
54
The Impact of Briggs and Greene
87
Templer February 1952May 1954
120
Tunku Abdul Rahman and
160
Conclusion
204
Notes
216
Bibliography
283
Index
296
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

About the author (2002)

KUMAR RAMAKRISHNA is Associate Professor and Head of the Centre of Excellence for National Security at the S. Rajaratnam School of International Studies in Singapore. He has authored and co-authored several books and journals including Emergency Propaganda: The Winning of Malayan Hearts and Minds 1948-1958 (RoutledgeCurzon, 2002) and After Bali: The Threat of Terrorism in Southeast Asia (World Scientific Publishing Company, 2004).

Bibliographic information